Bullying

Visit our Family Safety Center for more safety information, tools, and resources.

Teens

If you see something on Facebook you don't like, you have options. Here are a few things you can do:

  • If you’re not happy with a post you’re tagged in, you can remove the tag.
  • If you want the post taken down, you can ask the person who posted it to remove it. They may not know it upsets you.
  • If you want help, reach out to someone you trust, like a parent or teacher.
  • If you need to escalate the issue, you can unfriend or block the person.
  • If the post is abusive, please report it to us.

Please keep in mind that something you don't like on Facebook might not violate the Facebook Community Standards. Visit the Family Safety Center for more safety information, tools and resources.

Last edited about 5 months ago
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If you see a friend being targeted or bullied on Facebook, please report this to us. If you think your friend needs help right away, let someone you trust know, like a parent or teacher.
Last edited about 4 months ago
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Don't worry, your report is anonymous. When something gets reported to Facebook, we'll review it and remove anything that doesn't follow the Facebook Community Standards. We don't include any information about the person who filed the report when we reach out to the person responsible.

Please keep in mind that reporting something to Facebook doesn't guarantee that it will be removed. You may see something you don't like on Facebook that doesn't violate the Facebook Terms.

Last edited about 5 months ago
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We recommend reaching out to an adult you trust, like a parent, teacher or coach. This doesn't have to be someone who uses Facebook. You can send them a message or an email, give them a call or meet with them in person. The important thing is for you to find someone you trust and:

  • Explain what's going on
  • Tell them how you're feeling
  • Ask them to help you figure out what to do next
Last edited about 3 months ago
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No, these reports are anonymous. If you don't want to report the photo to Facebook, you can use the report link to send a message to your friend and ask them to remove it. This doesn't generate a report to Facebook.

Last edited about 5 months ago
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To block someone:

  1. Click at the top right of any Facebook page.
  2. Click How do I stop someone from bothering me?
  3. Enter the name or email address of the person you want to block and click Block.
  4. If you entered a name, select the specific person you want to block from the list that appears.

People will not be notified when you block them.

If you can't find someone using this method, try going to the person's profile and selecting Report/Block from the dropdown.

If you still can't find the person you want to block, it's possible that this person no longer uses Facebook or has restricted their privacy settings. Keep in mind that you can always control the audience of stuff you share.

Last edited about 2 weeks ago
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The best thing you can do is ask your friend to report this person from a computer using the Report link located in the on the top of every profile.

If this person is pretending to be you, learn how to report an impostor account.

Last edited about 2 weeks ago
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Parents

If someone reaches out to you for help, respond and let them know you’re there for them. Here are a few other things you can do to help:
  • Block and Report: Remind your friend to block the person responsible without responding directly to the bullying or escalating the conflict in any way. Also, make sure the bullying content has been reported to Facebook. We'll review the report and remove anything that violates our Statement of Rights and Responsibilities.
  • Restrict privacy settings: Advise your friend to use their privacy settings to control who can view information on their profile.
  • Evaluate and document: Is someone at risk of physical harm? Contact your local law enforcement immediately if you’re worried about the safety of the person reaching out to you. Take screenshots of all bullying posts, and print them out to save.

Learn more about safety on Facebook by visiting our Family Safety Center.

Last edited about 2 weeks ago
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Depending on your teen’s age, you might go through their privacy shortcuts and account settings together and make selections you’re both comfortable with. No matter how old your child is, we recommend that you make using Facebook responsibly part of an ongoing conversation about the internet and technology. Talk about your expectations about how they'll behave and help them understand what’s safe and what they need to be aware. Be sure your teen understands these basics of internet safety:

  • Never share your password
  • Think before you post
  • Only accept friend requests from people you know personally
  • Report anything that looks suspicious (learn how)
Last edited about 4 months ago
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Facebook doesn’t tolerate bullying. Period. It’s a violation of the Facebook Community Standards and the Facebook Terms. We remove bullying content when we become aware of it, and may disable the Facebook account of anyone who bullies or attacks another.

The best way to report bullying to us is by using our report links.

For more information about how to deal with bullying, please review the following resources:

  • A Thin Line: MTV's A Thin Line campaign empowers kids to identify, respond to, and stop the spread of digital abuse in their own lives and among their peers. The campaign is built on the understanding that there's a "thin line" between what may begin as a harmless joke and something that could end up having a serious impact.
  • Beatbullying.org is a bullying prevention charity, working to empower people to understand, recognize, and say no to bullying, violence and harassment by giving them the tools to transform their lives and the lives of their peers.
  • Childnet-int.org works with organizations around the world to coordinate efforts and help make the Internet a great and safe place for children.
  • Commonsense.org provides trustworthy information, education, and an independent voice helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology.
  • ConnectSafely.org is an online forum designed to give teens and parents a voice in the public discussion about youth online. It also offers social-media safety tips for teens and parents, the latest youth-tech news, and many other resources.
  • Cyberbullying Research Centerprovides up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents and serves as a clearinghouse of information about the ways adolescents use and misuse technology.
  • Family Safety Online Institute.org works to make the online world safer for kids and families by identifying and promoting best practices, tools and methods in the field of online safety that also respect free expression.
  • NetSmartz.org is an interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. Designed for children 5 -17.
  • UK Council for Child Internet Safety is a collection of resources.
  • WiredSafety is a cyber-neighborhood watch run entirely by volunteers around the world. Three popular programs are STOP cyberbullying, Teenangels, and WiredCops.
Last edited about 3 months ago
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The Facebook Network of Support (NOS) is comprised of five leading LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) advocacy organizations in conjunction with MTV’s "A Thin Line" campaign. These organizations serve in a consultative capacity to Facebook on issues like anti-gay bullying. Learn more about these organizations:
Last edited about 4 months ago
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  • A Thin Line: MTV's A Thin Line campaign empowers kids to identify, respond to, and stop the spread of digital abuse in their own lives and among their peers. The campaign is built on the understanding that there's a "thin line" between what may begin as a harmless joke and something that could end up having a serious impact.
  • Beatbullying.org is a bullying prevention charity, working to empower people to understand, recognize, and say no to bullying, violence and harassment by giving them the tools to transform their lives and the lives of their peers.
  • Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) works to track and bring offenders to account either directly or in partnership with local and international forces.
  • Childnet-int.org works to track and bring offenders to account either directly or in partnership with local and international forces.
  • Commonsense.org provides trustworthy information, education, and an independent voice helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology.
  • ConnectSafely.org is an online forum designed to give teens and parents a voice in the public discussion about youth online. It also offers social-media safety tips for teens and parents, the latest youth-tech news, and many other resources.
  • Cyberbullying Research Center provides up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents and serves as a clearinghouse of information about the ways adolescents use and misuse technology.
  • FOSI.org works to make the online world safer for kids and families by identifying and promoting best practices, tools and methods in the field of online safety that also respect free expression.
  • NCMEC.org serves as the US’s resource on missing and sexually exploited children, providing information and resources to law enforcement and other professionals, parents, and children, including child victims.
  • NetSmartz.org is an interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. Designed for children 5 -17.
  • OnguardOnline.gov is a program of the (US) Federal Trade Commission providing practical tips from the government and technology industry on protecting against internet fraud.
  • TRUSTe.com is a company that helps businesses promote online safety and trust, and guides consumers to sites that protect their online privacy.
  • UK Council for Child Internet Safety is a collection of resources.
  • WiredSafety is a nonprofit providing innovative and effective tools to help young people make wise choices in a world of media and technology. Three popular programs are STOP cyberbullying, Teenangels, and WiredCops.
Last edited about 5 months ago
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