Scams

Phishing

Sometimes people create fake websites that look like the Facebook login page. When you enter your email and password on one of these pages, they record your information and keep it. This is called phishing.

With access to your login information, these people can then access Facebook on your behalf and post things to a large group of friends. These messages or links are usually ads telling friends to check out videos or products.

  • If your account is automatically sending out messages or links, secure it here.
  • If you think your friend's account was phished, tell them to change their password and run anti-virus software on their computer.

Here is an example of a fake login page with a URL that isn't from Facebook.

Last edited about 3 weeks ago
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Phishing happens when someone is tricked into downloading bad software or entering their login info (ex: email and password) on a fake Facebook login page. Often, their account will start automatically sending messages or links to their Facebook friends. These messages and links are usually ads telling friends to check out videos or products.

  • If your account is automatically sending out spammy messages or links, secure it here.
  • If you think your friend's account was phished, tell them to change their password and run anti-virus software on their computer.

"Send money" scams happen when cybercriminals buy people's login info and use it to log in and take over these accounts. This often starts with your email account. Then, once someone is in your email account, they can request a new password to your Facebook account. With "send money" scams someone else is actually logging into your account, sending personalized messages or chats to your friends, claiming that you are stuck in another country and asking for money.

Last edited over a year ago
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If a friend sends you a suspicious link in chat, their account may have been phished.

When you receive a chat like this:

  • Do not click the link. If you click it accidentally, don’t enter your email or password information on the page that opens. Close the page right away.
  • If you do click the link, reset your password from your Account Settings. This is to make sure your own account is secure.
  • Have the friend who sent the message review the phishing section of the Help Center and take the suggested security measures.
  • Click in the top right of the chat window and select Report as Spam or Abuse. If you report a chat session as suspicious, the link in the chat is flagged for review, helping our systems fight spam. Your friend's account will not be affected directly when you report a chat session.
Last edited about 4 months ago
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Many scammers try to trick people with fake offers of free, rare, secret or exclusive digital goods (ex: coins, chips, gifts).

Beware of:

  • Messages with misspellings and typos, multiple fonts or oddly-placed accents.
  • Messages that claim to have your password attached. Facebook will never send you your password as an attachment. Learn more about suspicious emails.
  • Mismatched links: When you hover over a link, look at the status bar at the bottom of your browser window, and make sure the link actually goes to the place shown in the email.
  • Messages asking for your personal information. Facebook will never ask you for:
    • Your account password
    • Your social security number or tax identification number
    • Your full credit card number or PIN
  • Messages claiming that your account will be deleted or locked unless you take immediate action.

When in doubt, type www.facebook.com into your browser to get to Facebook. We also recommend checking official Facebook Pages or app Pages before clicking on any promotions.

Last edited about 3 months ago
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Suspicious Emails

Do not respond to this email. Facebook will never request your password over email, and we advise against providing your login information to anyone under any circumstances.

Last edited about 3 months ago
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Spammers and scammers sometimes create phony emails that look like they’re from Facebook. These emails can be very convincing. They might look like:

  • Notifications about friend requests, messages, events, photos and videos
  • False accusations that you're abusing Facebook
  • Warnings that something will happen to your account if you don't update it or take another immediate action
  • Claims or offers that sound too good to be true (ex: You've won the Facebook Lottery!)

If an email or Facebook message looks strange, don’t click any of the links in it or open any attachments.

Note: Facebook will never ask you for your password in an email or send you a password as an attachment.

Last edited about 4 months ago
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Suspicious Notifications

If you got a Facebook password reset email that you didn't request, it's likely that someone accidentally entered your email address or username when attempting to log into their account. This often happens if you have a popular username or email address. As long as you don't click the link contained in the email, no action will be taken and your account will remain secure.

If you receive a second email confirming that your password was reset, secure your account.

Last edited about 9 months ago
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Most likely, someone tried to sign up for a Facebook account using your email address by mistake. The sign-up process isn't finished until someone clicks the link in this email, so the easiest thing to do is ignore the email. You can also:

Last edited about 2 months ago
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If you got an email saying your account's been reactivated and you didn't request this, it's possible that another person attempted to log into your account using your email address and password. We recommend that you reset your password.

You should also make sure that any email addresses associated with your account are secure. Remember that anyone who can read your email can probably also access your Facebook account.

Last edited about 3 months ago
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Some peoples' email notification preferences have changed automatically. This problem may be caused by using the Facebook app on your mobile phone (ex: BlackBerry). If your email notifications were automatically turned on or off, please let us know.

Last edited about a month ago
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Yes. This ad is from Facebook. We want to make sure you don't get locked out of your account so we've put together a tool to help you check the security of your account and update your info.

We recommend that you add other contact info to your account (ex: another email address or mobile phone number) so we can contact you if you ever lose access to your main email address. Note that we may ask you to re-enter your password when updating sensitive account info. Get started.

Last edited over a year ago
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Take Action

Here are a few things you can do to keep your account safe:

  • Think before you click. Never click suspicious links, even if they come from a friend or a company you know. This includes links sent on Facebook (ex: in a chat or story) or in emails. If one of your friends clicks a spam link, they could accidentally send you or tag you in spammy posts. You also shouldn't download things (ex: a .exe file) if you aren’t sure what they are. Learn more about recognizing suspicious emails.
  • Watch out for fake Pages and apps/games. Be suspicious of Pages promoting offers that are too good to be true. If in doubt, check to see if a Page is verified. Also be mindful when you install new apps or games. Sometimes scammers use bad apps and games to gain access to your Facebook account.
  • Don't accept friend requests from people you don't know. Sometimes scammers will create fake accounts to friend people. Becoming friends with scammers allows them access to spam your Timeline, tag you in posts and send you malicious messages. Your real friends may also end up being targeted.
  • Pick a unique, strong password. Use combinations of at least 6 letters, numbers and punctuation marks and don't use this password for any of your other accounts. You can also use a password safe like LastPass, KeePass or 1Password to set and remember unique passwords for your account. Learn how to change your password.
  • Never give out your login info (ex: email address and password). Sometimes people or pages will promise you something (ex: free poker chips) if you share your login info with them. These types of deals are carried out by cybercriminals and violate the Facebook Statement of Rights and Responsibilities. If you're ever asked to re-enter your password on Facebook (ex: you're making changes to your account settings) check to make sure the address of the page still has facebook.com/ in the URL (web address).
  • Log in at www.facebook.com. Sometimes scammers will set up a fake page to look like a Facebook login page, hoping to get you to enter your email address and password. Make sure you check the page's URL before you enter your login info. When in doubt, you can always type facebook.com into your browser to get back to the real Facebook.
  • Update your browser. The newest versions of internet browsers have built-in security protections. For example, they might be able to warn you if you're about to go to a suspected phishing site. Facebook supports:
  • Run anti-virus software. To protect yourself from viruses and malware, scan your computer. You can learn more and download this software for free:
Last edited about 3 weeks ago
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We remove things that don't follow the Facebook Terms (ex: nudity, bullying, graphic violence, spam). If you come across something on Facebook that doesn't follow the Facebook Terms, use the report link near the post or photo to submit a report.

Other tools for addressing abuse

It's possible that you might see something you don't like on Facebook that doesn't actually violate the Facebook Terms. If you come across something you'd rather not see, you can:

For information about what is and is not allowed on Facebook, please read the Facebook Community Standards.

Last edited about 3 weeks ago
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To report a story on your Timeline or mark a post on your Timeline as spam:

  1. Hover over the story
  2. Click
  3. Select I don't want to see this from the dropdown menu
  4. Click Why don't you want to see this?
  5. Select It's spam and follow the on-screen instructions.

Note: If a story has a link, you'll be able to click This Is Spam from the first dropdown menu to report it.

Last edited about 3 months ago
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To block someone:

  1. Click at the top right of any Facebook page.
  2. Click How do I stop someone from bothering me?
  3. Enter the name or email address of the person you want to block and click Block.
  4. If you entered a name, select the specific person you want to block from the list that appears.

People will not be notified when you block them.

If you can't find someone using this method, try going to the person's profile and selecting Report/Block from the dropdown.

If you still can't find the person you want to block, it's possible that this person no longer uses Facebook or has restricted their privacy settings. Keep in mind that you can always control the audience of stuff you share.

Last edited about 2 weeks ago
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