World Press Freedom Day - May 3, 2011

May 3, 2011 at 12:57am

At IPS's core is the belief that information is an agent of change. But what happens when the free flow of information is muzzled? For World Press Freedom Day, we takes stock of this critical civil liberty through our global network of correspondents - from Mexico and Sri Lanka to Egypt and the World Wide Web. Click through to see our coverage.

 

 

 

 

Flagged for Removal: Online Censorship on the Rise by Aprille Muscara in Washington

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=55464

Media analysts warn that the desperate deployment of information control – a time-tested tactic of repressive regimes – adapted to today's new technologies of communication is but part of a growing global trend.

 

 

 

 

 

Radio Chinelo

Radio Chinelo
MEXICO: Journalists Defy Violence, Self-Censorship  

by Daniela Pastrana in Mexico City 

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=55462

In Mexico, the country in the Americas facing the worst wave of violence against reporters, different journalistic initiatives are combating this dynamic, which fuels a tendency towards self-censorship.

 

 

 

 

Not as much press freedom as many would like. (Cam McGrath/IPS)

Not as much press freedom as many would like. (Cam McGrath/IPS)
EGYPT: Press Freedom Comes with a Few Red Lines  

by Cam McGrath in Cairo

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=55452

The collapse of autocratic regimes in Tunisia and Egypt has broken the state’s stranglehold on the local press, but journalists and bloggers must still be careful what they say.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A colleague lights candles at the grave of assassinated editor Lasantha Wickrematunge. (Amantha Perera/IPS)

A colleague lights candles at the grave of assassinated editor Lasantha Wickrematunge. (Amantha Perera/IPS)
SRI LANKA: War Long Over, Media Still Muzzled  

by Amantha Perera in Colombo

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=55456

It has been two years since the end of Sri Lanka’s decades-long war, and life in general has begun to slowly edge back towards normalcy here. Not so for the country’s besieged media community, according to observers and journalists alike - reporting still feels hemmed in and muzzled, they say.