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4.5
4 Reviews
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Raymond Nyuli
· December 21, 2016
GK Sound did an excellent job of sound reinforcement for the B3 Kings concert in the Rex Hall. Greg and Anton handled all the tech. Anton's knowledge of the room was a big help. The sound was well ...balanced, well-rounded and had a very natural feel to it. See More
Sterling Hunte
· July 22, 2017
Your contribution certainly enhanced St. Luke's sound.
Anton's Audio must be blazing the trail. Good luck.
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Acoustic musicians and vocalists spend years of practice and thousands of dollars perfecting their distinctive sound. Not always will this considerable investment of time and money be evident. Much can be lost when the performance needs a little help from a sound system.

Most systems are designed with loudness being paramount, often missing the subtleties and inherent nuances so important in acoustic performances. There is however an alternative. At least one person has a sol...ution.

Anton Niedersteiner has studied acoustics, psychoacoustics (the way people hear), electronics and audio engineering. He has assimilated this knowledge with years of experience to produce sound systems (and processes) designed to retain the ambience of a live acoustic experience. Some of this equipment he has created to fulfill a specific function and is unique to his system.

Prior to setting up Anton tries to meet with the performers and scout the venue. He can usually ascertain the general acoustics of a hall within a few minutes and by asking the right questions he quickly determines what the musicians are trying to achieve. This enables him to select the best components for the job.

Anton sums it up this way: "There are three keys to achieving perfect sound. Use superb pickup techniques. Use the best equipment that suits the need. Synchronize the PA sound with the stage sound."

During the show itself Anton constantly listens for any anomaly which may distract from the performance and quickly sets it right. He may also on occasion use the capabilities within his system to subtly add dynamics or ambience, all in the most natural way.

The end result is an unqualified musical event. Those in attendance experience the performance to it's full extent and often participate more completely.

For a more complete resume and contact information, please see the About page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/AntonsAudio/about/?ref=page_internal

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Accommodating for poor acoustics in listening rooms takes energy. It is mental work done subconsciously. Also, the acoustic experience is compromised since the room adds to the original recording.

David Clark explores how human hearing accommodates to its surroundings which touches upon how music sounds in various spaces. Don't miss the demo of near a...
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It might have taken 7 years longer than planned, and it might have cost ten times more than the original budget, but as you can see from these incredible pictures, Hamburg's new concert hall was definitely worth the wait.
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Anton's Audio is with Anton Niedersteiner and Christo Vutev.

Finished tracking Strio-V today. CD should be out by Oct 1st.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing and hat

Here's a collection of links to articles which were republished here several months ago (saves scrolling through the time line).

Unplugged Sound, The Concept https://www.facebook.com/AntonsAudio/posts/1316315361722814

Disappearing Act https://www.facebook.com/AntonsAudio/posts/1316321235055560

... See More

For the people believing in the A-432Hz theory.

In exploring the 432 Hz debate at Ask.Audio, we soon realised this topic wasn't going to be resolved in one article. Here Assaf Dar Sagol explores the fact and
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Video demonstrating how to read one of the new LUFS loudness meters, and what it means for your audio. Download the example audio file here: http://productio...
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Astounding!

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Rick Beato - Everything Music

It's not enough to have a great ear without a knowledge of harmony. Here is my 9-year-old son Dylan demonstrating both. Check out the cluster at 2:07

https://youtu.be/RsJl6Pys880 Just good, really good.

This is your brain. This is your brain on music. Cognitive Psychologist Daniel Levitin and how music affects the brain.
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Directional Bass

Following is a re-post of an article I first published many years ago on my website at the time ( http://www.unpluggedsound.com ). Since most have already been published here on this Facebook page, this will probably be the last such article to be re-published for a while. To see them Scroll down the time line or try using the search feature.

Directional Bass.

...Continue Reading

Avoiding Feedback, Rooms

Following is a re-post of an article I first published many years ago on my website at the time ( http://www.unpluggedsound.com ). Most have already been published here on this Facebook page. To see them Scroll down the time line or try using the search feature.

Avoiding Feedback, Rooms

...

Anyone who has ever engineered audio in more than one room knows not all rooms are the same. A simple understanding of what happens to sound within a room helps to decide what equipment to use and where to place it. Consider the room as another component of the audio system, one with very few variables.

Construction materials, finishes, wall size ratios & orientation, ceiling height, floor covering, furnishings, occupancy, to name some, are factors which contribute to the acoustic character of a room. Being familiar with these functions and how they contribute to a room's sound will better enable you to use it optimally.

Here are some general rules of thumb:

Walls constructed of drywall over studs leak bass. Much of the low frequency energy goes right through these walls. Concrete, block or earth walls (below grade) on the other hand channel bass, sometimes acting like large low frequency horns.

Materials absorb frequencies according to thickness. Thicker materials absorb sound down to lower frequencies than thinner materials. A typical 1/4 inch carpet for example absorbs mostly everything above 4Khz and progressively less below this frequency, absorbing virtually nothing below about 800 Hz.

Broadband diffusion is always desirable. Abruptly alternating rectangular surfaces of varying heights and sizes are highly diffusive. Elliptical and splayed surfaces, though not as diffusive, help tame flutter echoes as well.

Recognizing these surfaces within a room will give you an idea of what happens to sound once it leaves the loudspeakers.

Be especially attentive to paths of reflection. It's quite common to get feedback from stage monitors when the sound is reflected back into the microphones via a stage wall. Sometimes it's less obvious. Even a nearby reflective surface such as that of a piano or other instrument can initiate feedback.

If the room is fairly live, feedback will occur via multiple reflections from the main loudspeakers. Sound from these bounces around the room several times before reaching the microphones. This can be a very difficult and frustrating situation to work in. Without changing the room, loudspeaker directivity and careful placement are keys to solving this problem. Focusing sound at the listeners and keeping it off the walls will go a long way in managing this source of feedback.

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Copyright © 2005 Anton Niedersteiner. All rights reserved.

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Avoiding Feedback, Loudspeakers

Following is a re-post of an article I first published many years ago on my website at the time ( http://www.unpluggedsound.com ). There are several more archived articles yet to be published. In the next few days I'll be publishing some more of them. Some have already been published here on this Facebook page. To see them Scroll down the time line or try using the search feature.

Avoiding Feedback, Loudspeakers

...Continue Reading

Avoiding Feedback, Equalization

Following is a re-post of an article I first published many years ago on my website at the time ( http://www.unplugged.com ). There are several more archived articles yet to be published. In the next few days I'll be publishing some more of them. Some have already been published here on this Facebook page. To see them Scroll down the time line or try using the search feature.

Avoiding Feedback, Equalization

...Continue Reading

Avoiding Feedback, Mixer Gain

Following is a re-post of an article I first published many years ago on my website at the time ( http://www.unpluggedsound.com ). There are several more archived articles yet to be published. In the next few days I'll be publishing some more of them. Some have already been published here on this Facebook page. To see them Scroll down the time line or try using the search feature.

Avoiding Feedback, Mixer Gain

...Continue Reading