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Yummy, health-giving and free! Delicious dandelion salad https://t.co/4jdgbW4bpi
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Gardening Gusto with Katherine Whiteside

Delicious Dandelion Salad

In fancy field-to-table New York City restaurants you can pay fifteen bucks for an organic dandelion salad but, to get to New York, yo...u will have to walk right past the dandelions growing in your yard. You do the math.

Fresh dandelion greens are rich in iron, potassium, beta-carotene and have vitamins A, C and D. Of course, you should never eat dandelions from a lawn that is chemically treated. This means NO fertilizers, NO pesticides and NO herbicides. Also, do not eat dandelions that grow near the road as these will be contaminated with run-off from petroleum products and residual de-icing material.

This is how to harvest and prep dandelion greens: use a hand trowel or garden knife to dig up the entire dandelion plant. The ideal harvest size is about as big as your palm and the tastiest leaves are no longer than your middle finger. Dig up 10 plants to make one serving as the roots and big outer leaves are tossed out.

As with any garden-fresh greens, wash the leaves in a big bowl of cold water and change the water three or four times to make sure all the grit is rinsed away. Use a salad spinner to insure crispiness.

Here’s What You Need:
* Dandelion greens: prepared as above, several handfuls per serving
* Eggs: one freshly hard-boiled egg per serving
* Olive oil: the best you have, a splash
* Vinegar: I always prefer cider vinegar, but you may use whatever you like.
* Sea salt and fresh pepper: to taste

Just Do This:
1. Place a dollop of olive oil in your chosen salad bowl. Add salt and pepper and stir.
2. Place dandelion greens in bowl.
3. Peel and chop (or grate on your cheese grater) one hard-boiled egg on top of the greens.
4. Toss the greens and egg to lightly coat with oil. Add a dash of vinegar, sample and add until the balance is to your taste. Add more salt and pepper if you prefer.
5. Serve with crunchy bread, red wine, a side of new potatoes and, perhaps, the first grilled hamburger of the season. Ahhhh… spring.

This is part of the 342nd Gardening Gusto column Katherine has written for the PCNR. Stay tuned here for tried-and-true organic gardening tips and simply delicious family recipes. Katherine is the author of six books, including The Way We Garden Now, illustrated by pediatrician/gardener/artist Peter Gergely.

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Delicious Dandelion Salad

In fancy field-to-table New York City restaurants you can pay fifteen bucks for an organic dandelion salad but, to get to New York, you will have to walk right past the dandelions growing in your yard. You do the math.

Fresh dandelion greens are rich in iron, potassium, beta-carotene and have vitamins A, C and D. Of course, you should never eat dandelions from a lawn that is chemically treated. This means NO fertilizers, NO pesticides and NO herbici...des. Also, do not eat dandelions that grow near the road as these will be contaminated with run-off from petroleum products and residual de-icing material.

This is how to harvest and prep dandelion greens: use a hand trowel or garden knife to dig up the entire dandelion plant. The ideal harvest size is about as big as your palm and the tastiest leaves are no longer than your middle finger. Dig up 10 plants to make one serving as the roots and big outer leaves are tossed out.

As with any garden-fresh greens, wash the leaves in a big bowl of cold water and change the water three or four times to make sure all the grit is rinsed away. Use a salad spinner to insure crispiness.

Here’s What You Need:
* Dandelion greens: prepared as above, several handfuls per serving
* Eggs: one freshly hard-boiled egg per serving
* Olive oil: the best you have, a splash
* Vinegar: I always prefer cider vinegar, but you may use whatever you like.
* Sea salt and fresh pepper: to taste

Just Do This:
1. Place a dollop of olive oil in your chosen salad bowl. Add salt and pepper and stir.
2. Place dandelion greens in bowl.
3. Peel and chop (or grate on your cheese grater) one hard-boiled egg on top of the greens.
4. Toss the greens and egg to lightly coat with oil. Add a dash of vinegar, sample and add until the balance is to your taste. Add more salt and pepper if you prefer.
5. Serve with crunchy bread, red wine, a side of new potatoes and, perhaps, the first grilled hamburger of the season. Ahhhh… spring.

This is part of the 342nd Gardening Gusto column Katherine has written for the PCNR. Stay tuned here for tried-and-true organic gardening tips and simply delicious family recipes. Katherine is the author of six books, including The Way We Garden Now, illustrated by pediatrician/gardener/artist Peter Gergely.

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When to plant what: Sweet signs courtesy of Mother Nature https://t.co/4jdgbW4bpi
@ThePCNR @Organic2Garden @RodaleNews

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When to plant what: Sweet signs courtesy of Mother Nature

We’re experiencing starts and stops weather-wise, but old timers say that when you hear the peepers three different times, spring is here to stay.

Farm folklore is fascinating and one particular, old-fashioned rule governs this coming weekend: “Don’t plant lettuce on Good Friday because it will not grow.” Sounds like pure science to me, so you have been warned.

...

I’ll write more about tips for planting by the moon as the season revs up, but here are some early sowing signs that are simple to follow:

Plant peas before the forsythia blooms out.

When early daffodils open, it is time to plant beets, Swiss chard, lettuce, and spinach.

When dandelions bloom, plant carrots and potatoes.

Wait until the dogwoods and lilacs are in full bloom before planting bush beans and corn. These heat lovers actually germinate better in cool soil, then grow on when the weather gets warmer.

And for all you anxious types: don’t plant out tomato and pepper plants until the daylilies bloom.

Once again, pure science.

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Shared Holy Days (and Southern Episcopalian Matzo Ball Soup.) Free recipe for six grownups and one baby. https://t.co/4jdgbW4bpi @ThePCNR

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Shared Holy Days (and Southern Episcopalian Matzo Ball Soup)

In the Christian calendar, Holy Week is April 9th - 15th, 2017.
In the Jewish calendar, Passover is April 11th – 18th, 2017.
This confluence recalls a commandment from the Holy (Face)Book: “God says, ‘Just love everyone—I’ll sort ‘em out later.’”

...Continue Reading

Has your snow melted? Time to plant peas! Here's all you need to know for the best crop ever! https://t.co/4jdgbW4bpi

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Gardening folks! The snow has almost melted from the Foodtown parking lot. There was too much of it piled in the garden on St. Paddy's for the Annual Planting of the Peas, and time's a wasting!

The theme of this week is PEAS! what type, how, when and where?

First of all: what kind of peas do you want to grow? Last year we grew seven different varieties and learned that the purple podded peas, although heirloom and gorgeous, aren’t very productive. All the varieties here are ...our proven winners.

Don’t forget to buy extra packets to set aside for late summer planting and fall harvesting. I’ll remind when the time is right. Heaven is an unexpected pea crop for Thanksgiving!

We grow snow peas. These have flat pods and teeny peas and you eat the whole thing (‘Oregon Giant’ and ‘Avalanche’)

I especially love snap peas that have small-ish, tender pods with little peas inside. You eat the pods and the peas and we always grow ‘Sugar Ann’.

I don’t like shelling peas very much, but our “Gardening Gusto” illustrious illustrator, Peter Gergely, adores them. He grows ‘Premium’, ‘Sienna’, and ‘Penelope’.

I tried growing the peas that make the shoots that are supposedly edible.FAIL! Trying to eat the cute little shoots was like desperately trying to chew up tangles of strong, tasteless string. What did I miss?

Here’s the rest:

1. Don’t plant peas in the same place you grew them last year. Don’t plant them where garlic and onions grew or will grow as these stunt pea growth. Peas thrive near carrots, radishes, cukes, and beans.

2. Make a pea trellis before you plant. (See # 3.) Position so that you can plant on both sides of the trellis.

3. Peas climb by way of skinny little tendrils. They don’t twine around like runner beans so you have to provide string, chicken wire, or thin sticks for them to grab on to.

4. Use inoculant. This organic amendment enriches the soil especially for peas and beans. Inoculant helps grow bigger pea plants and increases yield.

5. When pea shoots are about 4 inches tall, guide them towards the trellis and mulch the row with straw to keep their roots cool.

6. Harvesting rule: pick, pick, pick! Don’t wait! Pick every day and store in fridge until you have enough to cook. Once the pods go from shiny green to matte, the peas get bitter. Bigger is not better, bigger is bitter.

Ready, set, PLANT!! Let the 2017 Garden of Eatin’ begin!

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Got gypsy moth caterpillars? Do you have pieces of leaves and caterpillar poop raining down from your trees? Are your roses getting eaten? Read how to conquer these vile munchers tomorrow, Wednesday June 8th, in Gardening Gusto in the Putnam County News and Recorder.

Sabellico's is now USDA Certified organic! Read all about it here: http://www.pcnr.com/…/Tell_Your_Mom_Sabellicos_Is_Now_Certi…. See you there on Friday!

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Sabellico Greenhouses & Florist

This Sunday May 15th is the frost date for our area. Which means we should be safe to plant things like tomatoes & peppers. This greenhouse is loaded with peppers waiting to get outside into the ground. Happy planting!

Read my feature about how Sabellico's transitioned to USDA Certified Organic and kept a three-generation family business blooming. Free access here: http://www.pcnr.com/

Sabellico Greenhouses & Florist added 5 new photos — at Sabellico Greenhouses & Florist.

It might look grey but the sun wants to come out. After a week of rain gear & muck boots we are happy to see everyone here enjoying themselves & celebrating Mother's Day. Thanks to everyone for coming out & lots of love to all the Mom's in our lives.

Don't prune away these odd looking egg nurseries. Look what hatches! https://t.co/YjHEtJ9YKf

“Baby praying mantis emerging - amazing nature!”
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Farm eggs, dandelion greens and pasta: Spring delights! Free recipe here: https://t.co/4jdgbW4bpi
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Dandy Egg Macaroni

Once you eat a local farm-fresh egg, with its deep-orange, stand-up yolk, you’ll realize how insipid conventional eggs are. Additionally, free-range, organic farm eggs are more nutritious than eggs from caged, medicated chickens. A chicken that runs around outside produces eggs that have 1/3 less cholesterol than a caged hen, ¼ less saturated fat, three times more Vitamin B, and seven times more beta carotene.

“Dandy Egg Macaroni” is a quick and delicious ...recipe that combines local eggs and fresh dandelion greens. It’s fast and satisfying after a chilly evening working in the garden—especially when accompanied with a glass of Pinot Grigio to take the edge off your early-season-gardening muscle aches. Roll on, Spring! We’re ready!

Here’s What You Need
• Elbow Macaroni: ½ box
• Olive oil: A splash for sautéing and for the macaroni
• Bacon: 3 slices cut into small pieces
• Onion: one small yellow, diced
• Garlic: fresh cloves, peeled and sliced, as many as you like (I use 5!)
• Red pepper flakes: a pinch
• Dandelion greens: pick fresh from your 100% organic lawn or purchase locally from Vera’s (845- 265- 2151): a big handful, washed and cut into strips
• Farm fresh eggs: 2 large, crack into a small bowl and stir gently until whites and yolk are barely mixed. Don’t beat.
• Parmesan cheese: freshly grated, a palm full for each serving
• Sea salt and freshly ground pepper: to taste

First Do This:
1. In a large pot of salted water, cook the macaroni to the al dente stage. Drain, replace in cooking pot with a splash of olive oil to prevent sticking.
2. In a large skillet on top of the stove, sauté over medium-low heat: the bacon, onion, garlic and red pepper flakes in a splash of olive oil until the bacon is cooked, but still tender.

Then Do This:
3. Stir in the dandelion leaves and cook briefly until they wilt.
4. Add the macaroni and gently heat. Do not over-stir or mixture will become gummy.
5. Add eggs and stir gently until cooked.
6. Remove from heat. Serve into bowls, top with Parmesan cheese, salt and pepper and chow down!

We have more than 1,500 followers on Facebook and Twitter. Join in for weekly recipes and tips. Katherine has written this column every week since 2010. She is the author of six books, including The Way We Garden Now, illustrated by Peter Gergely.

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I like carrots a lot, but....

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GrowVeg

This made us smile.
(Though obviously she's growing the wrong carrots! Here's how to grow the tastiest carrots you'll ever find:
https://www.growveg.com/gui…/growing-carrots-with-character/)

Image credit: Someecards