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This is a fascinating story to share with family and friends. It's the story of an Inuit oral historian who traced the history of Sir John Franklin's lost ships - - the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror - - in northernmost Canada from stories remembered, told, and passed on by his great grandmother and other Inuit elders. Indigenous oral histories are an important source of information for archaeologists, historians, anthropologists, ethnobotanists, and other disciplines. This lovely Inuit man died too young at 58. It's nice that The Economist dedicated the last page of the April 14 issue of the magazine to his story and his contribution to northern and maritime history. https://www.economist.com/…/21740384-inuit-oral-historian-a…

The Inuit oral historian and finder of Sir John Franklin’s lost ships was 58
economist.com

If you are attending the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Washington DC, please send along some fun and interesting photos and news bits of something we all might want to know about! #SAA2018 and #pubarch. Photo: our well-attended heritage session in Vancouver last year!

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#SAA2018 is almost upon us! Here's a summary, to the best of my knowledge, of archaeology education focused sessions and meetings. There's a lot to look forward too! If you know of a Pub Arch-related session that I missed, please put it in the comments. Also, note the hashtags - let's raise visibility for #pubarch and live tweet these sessions! Can't wait for DC!

Cheers,
Elizabeth 🙌

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We salute the Kentucky Archaeological Survey for winning the Society for American Archaeology's 2018 AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC EDUCATION!

Here's the award write-up: "The Kentucky Archaeological Survey and the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project is awarded SAA’s Award for Excellence in Public Education for their combination of advocacy and curriculum development in the field of archaeology. Their extraordinary contributions to documenting the archaeology of an enti...re working-class neighborhood have included historic preservation, conservation archaeology, cultural resource management, and broad outreach strategy including curriculum development. They have produced an outstanding
body of work on Davis Bottom, including curriculum directed towards “Project Archaeology: Investigating a Kentucky Shotgun House.” This award recognizes the work and long-term
service to the discipline by the Kentucky Archaeological Survey and their contributions to the field of public archaeology. Their work and dedication to advocacy and education is an
admirable model for all archaeologists and organizations to follow." Photos courtesy of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey

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Here's a fascinating article re ancient DNA and what we can learn about human migrations: "Fueled by advances in analyzing DNA from the bones of ancient humans, scientists have dramatically expanded the number of samples studied -- revealing vast and surprising migrations and genetic mixing of populations in our prehistoric past." Having just gotten my DNA results, this explains a tiny bit some of the vast complexity of our ancestry. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas…/2018/…/180221131851.htm

Fueled by advances in analyzing DNA from the bones of ancient humans, scientists have dramatically expanded the number of samples studied -- revealing vast and surprising migrations and genetic mixing of populations in our prehistoric past.
sciencedaily.com

"Arrival of Beaker folk changed Britain for ever, ancient DNA study shows." Here's another interesting story from The Guardian! DNA is continually transforming our views of the past. (But I have to tell you, as an American archaeologist I have a very difficult time looking at photos of human remains......and frankly, can't even look.)

https://www.theguardian.com/…/arrival-of-beaker-folk-change…

At least 90% of the ancestry of Britons was replaced by a wave of migrants, who arrived about 4,500 years ago, say researchers
theguardian.com

Today's story for sharing! The UK paper The Guardian always does a good job on many front. https://www.theguardian.com/…/laser-scanning-reveals-lost-a…

Groundbreaking lidar scanning reveals the true scale of Angamuco, built by the Purépecha from about 900AD
theguardian.com

Why bother being a member of the Society for American Archaeology? There's a lot of benefits and one includes FREE on-line Seminars like this one coming up on March 7! I'm a member of SAA and I just signed up! The instructor is the experienced and very knowledgeable Kristina Kilgrove! But check out the seminar even if you're not a member of SAA.

Hear about the importance of reaching the public through the media and learn tips on how to do it in March’s Online Seminar. FREE for SAA members. Learn more and register: http://ow.ly/vUTP50gAaxE

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1500 year old rock art in Chile tells the story of ancient whale hunters. Wonderful archaeology story for the day to share with friends and family! https://news.nationalgeographic.com/…/ancient-rock-art-sho…/

The paintings match historical artifacts that suggest hunters set out on small boats with makeshift harpoons.
news.nationalgeographic.com

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!!! Sending along some special archaeology hearts and love! Want to thank the Florida Public Archaeology Network - West Central Region for these awesome valentines!! Please SHARE the archaeology LOVE!

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Archaeologists continue to be awed by the extraordinary, complex, and sophisticated trade networks evident in Native communities across the greater Northeast (Vermont too!) and mid-west. You'll find this article from Sapiens fascinating! Share it please!
https://www.sapiens.org/…/hopewell-culture-transcontinenta…/

People who were part of the Hopewell culture ventured far and wide to obtain large quantities of raw materials.
sapiens.org

Here's an opportunity for you to participate in this survey to enhance public engagement in archaeology.....in Finland! Archaeologist Suzie Thomas is looking for all possible perspectives. Please share this with friends who may be interested. Here's the survey questionnaire (in English!)

https://docs.google.com/…/1FAIpQLSeg_B0k5JHe5Hmd7E…/viewform

and read more about the project below.

...

"About the project:
The Finnish Archaeological Finds Recording Linked Database (Suomen arkeologisten löytöjen linkitetty tietokanta – SuALT) is an idea to create a digital web service which caters for discoveries of archaeological material made by the public; especially, but not exclusively, metal detectorists. SuALT is a consortium project funded by the Academy of Finland involving researchers from the University of Helsinki, Aalto University and the Finnish Heritage Agency (formerly called the National Board of Antiquities). It will provide a sustainable output in the form of Linked Data, continuing to help the public engage with cultural heritage, and to generate new research opportunities.

The SuALT database will contain information about finds locations, photographs and text based descriptions of finds. In the future, metal detectorist may be able to inform about their finds directly in the field to the museum authorities with their smartphones. The information in this interactive database is planned to be public for all its users. Through SuALT, finders may look at other peoples’ finds and comment upon them at the same time as they can participate in interpreting them. At the same time this information will be available for museum authorities and archaeologists who will be able to see and research this data.
SuALT takes inspiration from the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) Finds Database (https://finds.org.uk/database) in England and Wales, however we aim to develop this database in a way that complements existing systems and laws in Finland, as well as international databases.

A key aspect of this development is to understand the potential needs and preferences of the different people who may interact with or make use of SuALT in the future. We hope that SuALT will result in a sustainable digital data resource that responds to different user needs, and which provides high quality archaeological research which draws on data from Finland and links seamlessly to similar data from other parts of Europe."

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Here's an interesting opportunity for you to participate in a survey to enhance a new public engagement project in Finland! Read more about the project, below, courtesy of archaeologist Suzie Thomas. Here's the survey questionnaire in English:
https://docs.google.com/…/1FAIpQLSeg_B0k5JHe5Hmd7E…/viewform

Share this with friends who may be interested!

...

"About the project:
The Finnish Archaeological Finds Recording Linked Database (Suomen arkeologisten löytöjen linkitetty tietokanta – SuALT) is an idea to create a digital web service which caters for discoveries of archaeological material made by the public; especially, but not exclusively, metal detectorists. SuALT is a consortium project funded by the Academy of Finland involving researchers from the University of Helsinki, Aalto University and the Finnish Heritage Agency (formerly called the National Board of Antiquities). It will provide a sustainable output in the form of Linked Data, continuing to help the public engage with cultural heritage, and to generate new research opportunities.

The SuALT database will contain information about finds locations, photographs and text based descriptions of finds. In the future, metal detectorist may be able to inform about their finds directly in the field to the museum authorities with their smartphones. The information in this interactive database is planned to be public for all its users. Through SuALT, finders may look at other peoples’ finds and comment upon them at the same time as they can participate in interpreting them. At the same time this information will be available for museum authorities and archaeologists who will be able to see and research this data.
SuALT takes inspiration from the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) Finds Database (https://finds.org.uk/database) in England and Wales, however we aim to develop this database in a way that complements existing systems and laws in Finland, as well as international databases.

A key aspect of this development is to understand the potential needs and preferences of the different people who may interact with or make use of SuALT in the future. We hope that SuALT will result in a sustainable digital data resource that responds to different user needs, and which provides high quality archaeological research which draws on data from Finland and links seamlessly to similar data from other parts of Europe.

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Tonight's story to share. "Truck driver plows into Peru's 2,000-year-old archaeological enigma." Very BAD move on the trucker's part.....Sad for humanity. http://www.cnn.com/…/nazca-lines-peru-truck-driv…/index.html

Peru's world renowned Nazca Lines were damaged when a rig plowed into the ancient site on Saturday, the country's ministry of culture said.
cnn.com

From SAA's #AskSAA series:

How do things end up underground?

From Rebecca Simon, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center Field Archaeologist: When people see an archaeological site, they may get confused. Why did people live underground in the past? How did the site get buried? In some cases, the shelters people used were partially or completely dug into the ground. Basin houses, pithouses, and kivas are just a few examples. While not all structures are built like that, when archae...ologists study a house or space used by people in the past, it is often underground. Nature plays a large role in this: wind, rain, snow, floods, decay, insects, and other animals will cause the structure to fall apart and get covered. People also contribute by tearing down structures or putting new ones on top of older ones. Structures’ foundations and footprints are buried over time. A hearth or fireplace from thousands of years ago may also get preserved if dirt lies on top of it and keeps the ash inside. This is why archaeologists may need to dig into the earth to study the past.

For more information, visit http://www.crowcanyon.org. Animation from the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center.

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Today's story for sharing with family and friends: "Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon'." Everyone LOVES crayons! Some of our earliest childhood memories was getting a BIG box of Crayola Crayons for Christmas or a birthday! https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas…/2018/…/180126095323.htm

Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork.
sciencedaily.com