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Reviews
7 Reviews
Tell people what you think
Marilyn Raymer
· January 5, 2017
Every trip to the Refuge is an adventure. Always something new to see and learn about
Jan Kutz Lackie
· November 28, 2014
We came upon the trail entirely by accident - and what a treasure. So many quiet little bits of art to be found, but only if you are very observant and look ve...ry closely and carefully around you. Such a delight! We were there on quiet and dark November morning - can't wait to see it in the spring or summer. See More
Videos
Feeling Chum-y! Chum salmon are an important part of the Willapa Bay ecosystem. As the spawned-out carcasses of the adults decompose, they seep valuable nutrients into the streams and forests where these fish are found. Later, their young swim out to the estuary as tiny fry, providing a critical food source for other salmonids, such as sub-adult Coho Salmon, who are putting on weight before heading out to sea. Spawning season occurs from late October to mid November. Visit your favorite creek during that time to watch this colorful fish surge up in groups during high tide and after heavy rains. Video taken by refuge volunteer Jim Ferrier.
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Ever wanted to see more of the U.S. Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment? Check out their Open House today from 10-2! Be sure to stop by the Refuge airboat and say hello!

U.S. Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment

Come stop by the station today from 10-2 for our annual Open House!

Dont miss this week's Willapa Nature Notes! "Skunk Cabbage" from the notebook of Kathleen Sayce will air on KMUN 91.9 Coast Community Radio today at 11am brought to you by the Friends of Willapa Refuge.

Missed an episode? No worries. Catch up here: http://friendsofwillaparefuge.org/willapa-nature-notes/

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Please join us tomorrow Wednesday May 17 from 5-7pm at the Cranberry Museum for the 2nd of 3 meetings to help make the new Natural Resource Center at Willapa National Wildlife Refuge a place that serves OUR community.

At this meeting, we will be presenting the results of your comments and survey information to date. You'll also get a sneak peak of some initial building sketches and help us select the type of building materials to create the "look" and "feel" of the buildin...g. Exciting!

If you missed the first meeting, its not too late to get involved or to provide comments. If you have not taken the survey, here's a link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/willapanaturalresourcecenter.

For more info: http://www.willapanaturalresourcecenter.com/

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Yesterday on International Migratory Bird Day at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum we celebrated the designation of Willapa Bay and Long Beach Peninsula as a site of International importance in the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network - WHSRN.

Designation was made possible because of the following landowners, conservation organizations and businesses:
Adrift Hotel & Spa
Audubon Washington...
Friends of Willapa Refuge
Forterra NW
Pacific Birds
Shelburne Inn
Shoalwater Bay Tribe: Native Community
The Nature Conservancy in Washington
Willapa National Wildlife Refuge
Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
Washington Department of Natural Resources
Washington State Parks & Recreation Commission
Washington State University Long Beach Research and Extension Unit

45,000 acres of Willapa Bay and Long Beach Peninsula are now voluntarily within the WHSRN conservation network playing an important role in conservation of shorebirds.
#birdday

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Here's some great tips from Audubon about how to tell a hairy woodpecker from a downy woodpecker.

Size and tail color are two of the biggest clues when deciphering these two backyard regulars.
audubon.org

Today is International Migratory Bird Day! Join us at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum from 2-4pm to celebrate the designation of Willapa Bay and Long Beach Peninsula as a site of INTERNATIONAL importance by Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network - WHSRN!
#BIRDDAY

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Lesser yellowlegs are a slender, long-legged shorebird that readily shows off the brightly colored legs that give it its name. It is an active feeder, often running through the shallow water to chase its prey. They fly 1,500-9,300 miles one-way during migration from boreal nesting sites to wintering sites in the Caribbean or South America.
#BIRDDAY

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Wilson’s Warblers are one of the smallest warblers in the U.S. They rarely slow down, dashing between willow and alder thickets, grabbing insects from one leaf after another, and popping up on low perches to sing. Wilson’s Warblers do not visit feeders, but you can provide habitat for them in your yard by landscaping with native trees and shrubs.
#BIRDDAY

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It looks like our Columbian white-tailed deer from Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-Tailed Deer are doing well at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. Turn up the volume and enjoy the sounds of nature. #PublicLands

550 Views
550 Views
USFWS Pacific Region

Stuck in your office today? Crank up the volume and enjoy the sights and sounds from Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. Get out and enjoy your #PublicLands every opportunity you get.

One of the most abundant dabbling ducks, the Green-winged Teal
migrates from far northern North America via all major flyways—
Pacific, Central, Mississippi, and Atlantic—to wintering grounds that range from coastal British Columbia all the way to Central America.
#BIRDDAY

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While walks on the beach with your dog may be relaxing for the two of you, it's very stressful (and possibly deadly) for the thousands of shorebirds trying to nest or rest in the midst of a long migration. Learn more about it at http://bit.ly/2qTfnQw

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USFWS Pacific Region

While walks on the beach with your dog may be relaxing for the two of you, it's very stressful (and possibly deadly) for the thousands of shorebirds trying to nest or rest in the midst of a long migration. Learn more about it at http://bit.ly/2qTfnQw

Dont miss this week's Willapa Nature Notes! "Green-winged Teal" from the notebook of Madeline Kalbach will air on KMUN 91.9 Coast Community Radio today at 11am brought to you by the Friends of Willapa Refuge.

Missed an episode? No worries. Catch up here: http://friendsofwillaparefuge.org/willapa-nature-notes/

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When birds migrate between nesting and wintering sites, they don’t just stop anywhere; they rely on a handful of resource-rich and strategically located sites, like Willapa Bay, where they may double their body weight as they acquire the energy-rich fat stores needed to fly thousands of kilometers across continents and oceans. These places are known as stopover sites. As birds journey between breeding and non-breeding sites, International Migratory Bird Day 2017 will celebrate the importance of the places and habitats where they stop to rest and refuel.
#IMBD2017 #Birdday

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Need a break from the concrete jungle? Try a visit to the USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System. Check out what Mother Nature had in store on a recent trip to Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. #PublicLands

Watch the video at http://bit.ly/VideoRidgefield

For those of us living in the concrete jungle, it’s easy to get lost in the daily routine of mass transit, highways that turn into parking lots, work and families. Many city dwellers find their solace in yoga, working out or a whole host of other alt
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