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How do we listen to music? How does music affect our brains? Music by composers Charles Shadle, Michele Zaccagnini and MIT student composers, these questions answered, and more! Part of the Cambridge Science Festival!

APR16
Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble updated their cover photo.
April 26
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Here's a short tidbit to wet your taste buds in preparation for Sunday's performance. What do our brains do when they listen to something like this? Come this Sunday to find out! 7.30pm @ the MIT Museum. Part of the 2017 Cambridge Science Festival. Free admission.
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The Art of Touching the Keyboard
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Triptych Rehearsal
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We have a fun(d)-raising event coming up at the famed Spindler Confections (Boston.com's Best Chocolate 2016). Jeremy Spindler will be leading a chocolate making demonstration and all guests will go home with some Spindler chocolates! May 11, Thursday, 7pm! Spread the word and hope to see you there!

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For those who missed it, here's some pictures from last night at the MIT Museum/Cambridge Science Festival! We're so grateful to have so many join us (standing/floor room only!) even on Easter! Join us next time, and do like our page to be in the loop!

[Anne Black, Robert Schulz, Michele Zaccagnini, Charles Shadle, Keeril Makan, Emily Koh]

Thank you all who came out tonight. It was most wonderful playing to a full house at the MIT Museum! We love playing there and being part of the Cambridge Science Festival. Till next time!

[Anne Black , Robert Schulz, Kathy Matasy, Frank Cunningham, Charles Shadle, Michele Zaccagnini, Josh McDermott, Sue-Ellen Hershman-Tcherepnin, Emily Koh]

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Dress rehearsing CharlesShadle's Three Southern Fables now. Swing by for the concert tonight at 7.30pm at the MIT Museum! Free admission!

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Dress rehearsing! If you want to know what a "brainist" (Michele Zaccagnini) does, come to the concert tonight! 7.30pm at the MIT Museum. Free admission!

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Join us tomorrow for Reality Show: Stalking the Musical Brain. Premieres of works by Charles Shadle and Michele Zaccagnini and six MIT students, and a special presentation by Dr Josh McDermott on the intersection between Neuroscience and Music! This is free, 7.30pm at the MIT Museum!

APR16

Join us this Sunday at 7.30pm! We will also be premiering a new work by Michele Zaccagnini for viola (Anne Black) and brainist (yes, you read right!) in addition to Charles Shadle's piece and music of MIT student composers!

STALKING THE MUSICAL BRAIN Why do we respond so strongly to music? Have you heard of the Wekinator? Join MIT neuroscientists, musicians and composers on a journey to explore what happens to our brains in the presence of music.
mta.mit.edu

Here's a short tidbit to wet your taste buds in preparation for Sunday's performance. What do our brains do when they listen to something like this? Come this Sunday to find out! 7.30pm @ the MIT Museum. Part of the 2017 Cambridge Science Festival. Free admission.

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The Dinos (Robert Schulz, Anne Black and Kathy Matasy) read new works written for them by MIT student composers last Friday. To hear these works performed again, and premieres of new commissions by Michele Zaccagnini and Charles Shadle, swing by our next show (part of the Cambridge Science Festival) at the MIT Museum. April 16, 7.30pm.

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We are proud to have two #nastywoman, Sue-Ellen Hershman-Tcherepnin and Emily Koh, as our co-Artistic Directors. Dinosaurs and pussies grab back! (Board meeting turned #womansmarch discussion.)

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Congrats, Scott!

http://www.wbur.org/artery/2016/12/27/best-classical

“Wheeler works from the personal to the universal, not the other way around.” Wow, what a nice way to descr...ibe my approach in these pieces, and what a nice way to end my musical year. Have I mentioned that Don Berman’s playing is amazing…

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From Roomful of Teeth's "Partita for 8 Voices" to Chiara String Quartet's "Bartók, By Heart," critic Keith Powers looks back at the year in classical (in mostly chamber settings) recordings.
wbur.org
The content of some “modern” music is just as human as what is thought of as “classical,” composer Yehudi Wyner explained to the audience at the concert featuring his music at the Boston Athenæum on Monday evening. His explanatory remarks were well taken; although there were a number of active compo
classical-scene.com

Happy Holidays, from all of us!

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Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration.

Do consider supporting Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble as we continue presenting new works this season and in future. All donations are tax-deductable, and you may easily do so online at http://www.dinosaurannex.org

Also, if you haven't yet, please like our new Facebook Page!

We were mentioned in the New York Times!

"What a lovely compliment Anthony Tommasini paid to Dinosaur Annex by choosing to end this article with mention of us! His recounting of Dino’s invitation to the eminent violinist and new music enthusiast Louis Krasner to speak before one of our concerts in 1983 was a sweet reminder of our more than 40 years of dedication to living composers." -- Sue-Ellen Hershman-Tcherepnin, Co-Artistic Director

http://www.nytimes.com/…/just-why-does-new-classical-music-…

The implication is that contemporary classic music is a specialty that an ordinary audience doesn’t appreciate. But there are ways out of this kind of thinking.
nytimes.com