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Come visit me at my website: gardennh.com
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FYI: Summer hours! Sometimes it takes me longer to get back to people in summer due to travel schedules - know that I will be in touch!

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Barrington Bloomers asked me to speak on the topic of succulents at the Barrington Library. Join me tonight - 6:30 to 7:45 - hands on activities and cool plants to check out. The plant pictured will be with us in spirit only as it happily resides at the Thompson School Greenhouse Conservatory at UNH. I will bring some of its babies though!

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A good day for a tomato harvest - 4 slicer varieties and 2 cherry varieties. Yum!

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Working on my tropical green thumb! Planted a pineapple, shopped for yucca (this will grow in NH!) and saw a beautiful Monarch chrysalis on a canna plant at Home Depot.

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It's flower time in my garden! Dahlia, daylily and echinacea purpea.

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My unique daylily varieties are starting to bloom...more to come!

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A few photos to inspire your summer garden daze...or days, you choose.
California poppies: these were "snow seeded". I tossed seeds onto the snow in March and voila! Poppies! Seriously.

The children at UNH Child Study and Development Center did an incredible job on garden plant markers thanks to guidance from their amazing teacher. These are made from pallets with a sharpened edge. They are also loving the compost bin Strafford County Master Gardener Association provided the... funds for.

And finally, the first absolutely beautiful and delicious cherries off of my Lapins Cherry tree. It is a very young tree and somehow the birds did not find the 3 cherries that were on it this year. I enjoyed them along with the first raspberries and strawberries from the garden. Yum!

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One of the aspects of being a Master Gardener that I truly love is creating connections. Today, I delivered a beautiful donation of plants from the wonderful UNH Thompson School Greenhouses to the UNH Child Study and Development Center. Thanks to this donation we will have lots of squash, Thai basil, melons, alyssum and much, much more in our community garden this summer. If you have not shopped the UNH greenhouse sale you need to wait until next April. But fear not - I promise to remind you to go! (More on Master Gardeners: Strafford County Master Gardener Association)

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Wilting in this mini heat wave? So are your plants! Here are some strategies: water as early as possible in the morning. If you need to water later in the day make sure leaves have time to dry before evening (this reduces chances of disease). Mulch! Although be cautious with heavy mulch around your rhododendrons (surface roots can suffocate with too much mulch). Salt marsh hay is a great option for keeping roots cooler and retaining water. You may see browning of leaf edges (called scorch) but your plants will recover from this. Keep an eye on ripening fruit as heat can accelerate ripening (lots of strawberries are red all of a sudden in my garden!). Consider adding a water source for butterflies, bees and birds in your garden. Enjoy the sunshine!

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Wednesday mornings are spent with my littlest gardening buddies at UNH Child Study and Development Center and their teachers. Writing a blog post about gardening with young children but remember - it's all about sensory exploration & investigation.

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Interesting article given the peach crop that seems to be taking shape on my (solo) tree an Butternut Farm. Wondering how this cool May/June weather will impact fruit ripening.

A double punch of unseasonably warm winter weather and an ill-timed freeze has devastated crops in Georgia and South Carolina.
nytimes.com

Yes, you can grow many different kinds of fruit in New England from cherries to quince! Pears, peaches, cherries (sweet & sour), apples, plums, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, grapes, blackberries (only plant thornless!), American persimmon and quince. Undoubtedly there are more...
I'm planning on a few blog posts on fruit growing but always consider planting a fruit tree or bush in your landscape when making changes - the birds will appreciate it. If you are not sure you'll consume all of the fruit, plant a true dwarf or a semi-dwarf. These are much smaller trees, easier to care for and less to harvest.

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Learn about pruning lilacs from our friends at Cooperative Extension. Or hire me to take care of yours!

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UNH Cooperative Extension Education Center
June 2

Lilacs should be pruned immediately after bloom. In this Grow it Green segment, Mary gives you advice on how to prune multi-stem shrubs, such as lilacs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z05Q0eg66AU.

It is truly spring when these lovely orchids appear in the woods. I have a few spots they where I have found them each year and I can now recognize their first leaves before they flower (and try to…
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Pollinator Talks this weekend! 11am or 1pm, Bedrock Gardens. Come enjoy the art from 3 local schools, fly a kite and learn about bees and pollinators.

Dry shade is the toughest place to get flower love. Plant some of these beauties - Epimedium x rubrum. It is a ground cover that will thrive in deep shade. Early bloom, best zone 4 to 8 and about 12 inches high. If it is not available at the nursery where you buy plants, tell them they can order it from Van Berkum Nursery.

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