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Did you know? South Asian American students don't always have ideal experiences in school. Often, South Asian American students may not be receiving adequate academic or socioemotional support from teachers, and many report low connectedness to school. Some South Asian Americans described their experiences in school as deeply negative; even "painful." These things often go overlooked because of harmful stereotypes -- like the "model minority myth" -- and this hurts the students and negatively impacts their overall experiences in school. And many of these issues can be connected back to low teacher cultural proficiency. ISAASE is trying to help improve South Asian American students' experiences, through outreach, research, and advocacy. Visit ISAASE.org to learn about our Teacher Cultural Proficiency Initiative (TCPI) to help improve teachers' general and specific cultural competence, to then improve student experiences. We offer FREE resources for teachers, such as fact sheets, quick tips, book lists (through our #brownbooksproject), and more. In the meantime, we are also trying to mitigate some of the negative impacts of low teacher cultural proficiency through our Family Outreach Initiative (FOI) to learn about the different resources and tools we are making available (including an upcoming mentorship program for students) to provide support and advocacy for students and their families. The success of our mission depends on support from people like you; please share our information with educators and people who are impacted. Visit ISAASE.org today to learn more. ✌🏼✌🏽✌🏾
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Thanks to Cornell University's South Asian Council for helping to spread the word about the need to better understand and *improve* South Asian American student experiences. The more we share this information, the greater the educator and community stakeholder buy-in. More data here: https://ISAASE.org/the-data

Thank you to American Bazaar Magazine for helping to share information about our organization!

Low teacher cultural proficiency and bias, and discrimination are challenges many South Asian students face: ISAASE founder.
americanbazaaronline.com

"There is a chance it might not work, but you’re going to regret not trying to do it."
An interview with journalist Jashvina Shah.
https://isaase.org/jashvina-shah/

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Posts

"There is a chance it might not work, but you’re going to regret not trying to do it."

An interview with journalist Jashvina Shah for our Be Inspired project. Read it here:
https://ISAASE.org/jashvina-shah

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Thank you to American Bazaar Magazine for helping to share information about our organization!

Low teacher cultural proficiency and bias, and discrimination are challenges many South Asian students face: ISAASE founder.
americanbazaaronline.com

"You want to be a trailblazer, but you also think - I want to know that there are others like me."

Did you see our #ISAASEinspired interview with Shaun Jayachandran (founder of Crossover Basketball and Scholars Academy in India) last weekend?
#ICYMI

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Now live: Our first ever #ISAASEinspired post -- an interview with Shaun Jayachandran, founder of Crossover Basketball and Scholars Academy India. Visit the page to read our interview with him!
https://isaase.org/inspired-by/shaun-jayachandran

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Thanks KitaabWorld for this share.

"But what I’m stuck on right now is the implication of a vast population of students who are taught by teachers who admit to knowing little about them or their ...backgrounds. I also admit that it is the very, very tip of the iceberg: my findings include hundreds of disconcerting bits of data, but almost all of it has greater implications for multicultural education researchers than the general public community."

Read this article by Dr. Punita Rice on her research about cultural proficiency of teachers re South Asians. We still have a long way to go!

http://theaerogram.com/teachers-dont-know-much-south-asian…/

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How can we, as South Asian Americans, improve teachers’ cultural proficiency related to our own backgrounds, or at least mitigate the negative effects of the low cultural proficiency?
theaerogram.com

The key takeaway recommendations for teachers:

(1) Know how cultural proficiency (and deficiencies in it) can contribute to students having negative experiences.
(2) Overcome belief in biases/stereotypes (including seemingly "positive" or innocuous ones, like the Model Minority Myth -- which is neither positive or innocuous in reality).
(3) Improve general cultural competence for supporting all diverse students, and aim to improve cultural literacy and proficiency specific... to student groups you teach.
(4) Provide more support to all students (without assuming students from certain backgrounds don't need the same support as their peers). This means academic support, support in developing executive functioning skills, and socioemotional support.
(5) Build stronger student-teacher relationships with students you might otherwise overlook.
(6) Increase access to diverse booklists and content (for yourself and your students). A good place to start is the #WeNeedDiverseBooks project, or the #BrownBooksProject. (Visit www.ISAASE.org/brown-books-project to learn more about the latter initiative.)

Resources are also available for teachers at ISAASE.org/resources

For a closer look at some of the key findings, please visit ISAASE.org - Improving South Asian American Students' Experiences or head to www.ISAASE.org/the-data. A PDF download of this visual (presented as part of a poster session by Dr. Punita Rice at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education second annual Celebration of Research) can be made available upon request. Please contact Dr. Punita Rice for a link.

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Dr. Punita C. Rice is with Johns Hopkins University School of Education and ISAASE.org - Improving South Asian American Students' Experiences at Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel.

A closer look at the visual for the presentation at Johns Hopkins University School of Education second annual Celebration of Research conference. This is a pos...ter/visual overview of selected findings from my research.

The key takeaway recommendations for teachers: (
1) Know how cultural proficiency (and deficiencies in it) can contribute to students having negative experiences.
(2) Overcome belief in biases/stereotypes (including seemingly "positive" or innocuous ones, like the Model Minority Myth -- which is neither positive or innocuous in reality).
(3) Improve general cultural competence for supporting all diverse students, and aim to improve cultural literacy and proficiency specific to student groups you teach.
(4) Provide more support to all students (without assuming students from certain backgrounds don't need the same support as their peers). This means academic support, support in developing executive functioning skills, and socioemotional support.
(5) Build stronger student-teacher relationships with students you might otherwise overlook.
(6) Increase access to diverse booklists and content (for yourself and your students). A good place to start is the #WeNeedDiverseBooks project, or the #BrownBooksProject. Visit www.ISAASE.org/brown-books-project to learn more about the latter initiative.

Resources are also available for teachers at ISAASE.org/resources

For a closer look at some of the key findings, please visit ISAASE.org - Improving South Asian American Students' Experiences or head to www.ISAASE.org/the-data. A PDF download of this visual can be made available upon request.

See More

Pronouncing names correctly is a big deal.
Our Name Pronunciation Guide is now live.
https://isaase.org/name-pronunciation-guide/

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Did you know?

South Asian American students don't always have ideal experiences in school. Often, South Asian American students may not be receiving adequate academic or socioemotional support from teachers, and many report low connectedness to school.

Some South Asian Americans described their experiences in school as deeply negative; even "painful."

...

These things often go overlooked because of harmful stereotypes -- like the "model minority myth" -- and this hurts the students and negatively impacts their overall experiences in school.

And many of these issues can be connected back to low teacher cultural proficiency.

ISAASE is trying to help improve South Asian American students' experiences, through outreach, research, and advocacy.

Visit ISAASE.org to learn about our Teacher Cultural Proficiency Initiative (TCPI) to help improve teachers' general and specific cultural competence, to then improve student experiences. We offer FREE resources for teachers, such as fact sheets, quick tips, book lists (through our #brownbooksproject), and more.

In the meantime, we are also trying to mitigate some of the negative impacts of low teacher cultural proficiency through our Family Outreach Initiative (FOI) to learn about the different resources and tools we are making available (including an upcoming mentorship program for students) to provide support and advocacy for students and their families.

The success of our mission depends on support from people like you; please share our information with educators and people who are impacted.

Visit ISAASE.org today to learn more.

✌🏼✌🏽✌🏾

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Thank you, The Aerogram, for sharing key findings from Dr. Punita Rice's research, indicating this harsh reality:

Many teachers simply do not know much about their South Asian American students.

"But what I’m stuck on right now is the implication of a vast population of students who are taught by teachers who admit to knowing little about them or their backgrounds." - Read more in education researcher Punita Rice's post.

How can we, as South Asian Americans, improve teachers’ cultural proficiency related to our own backgrounds, or at least mitigate the negative effects of the low cultural proficiency?
theaerogram.com

ICYMI - Why research on South Asian American students matters.

"...like all students, they still need culturally responsive support in order to succeed."
theaerogram.com