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Mary Atkins Author

During my father’s lifetime, progress spanned from riding in a horse and buggy, to riding in a motor car, the first flight by Wilbur and Orville Wright to the f...irst commercial flight, from a crystal radio to the first television to the ultimate viewing of the grainy images of a man walking on the moon. Packed into that lifetime he experienced World War 1 as a boy and served in World War 11.

For me a milestone lifestyle transformation happened with the advent of television. First a 9 -inch-screen-black and white-set through to and 18 inch colour TV. In 1969 I took my youngest daughter, a babe in arms, out into the dark night to show her moon and whisper in her ear that men were walking on it's surface at that very moment in time.

There have been many changes in the last seven decades, some subtle some major. In the medical world – artificial hearts, contact lenses, micro, keyhole and remote surgery, pap smear, ultrasound, birth control and tampons.

But ‘the greatest thing since sliced bread,’ must be communication technology. In the 70s we still wrote letters. Most homes had one phone, located in hall on a table that housed the white pages and 'not happy Jan' telephone directories and notepad. When the first mobile, bigger than a house brick arrived in the early 80s only a handful of people were rich enough or strong enough to own one. A decade later and we have a mobile that fits into our top pocket.

Now social media has spun us around again creating a brave new world, What is next? My guess is virtual reality technology, will shake off it's novelty gloss and will develop innovative technology for medical research. Bring it on. Wishing you a healthy, innovative and rewarding 2018.

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During my father’s lifetime, progress spanned from riding in a horse and buggy, to riding in a motor car, the first flight by Wilbur and Orville Wright to the first commercial flight, from a crystal radio to the first television to the ultimate viewing of the grainy images of a man walking on the moon. Packed into that lifetime he experienced World War 1 as a boy and served in World War 11.

For me a milestone lifestyle transformation happened with the advent of television. Fi...rst a 9 -inch-screen-black and white-set through to and 18 inch colour TV. In 1969 I took my youngest daughter, a babe in arms, out into the dark night to show her moon and whisper in her ear that men were walking on it's surface at that very moment in time.

There have been many changes in the last seven decades, some subtle some major. In the medical world – artificial hearts, contact lenses, micro, keyhole and remote surgery, pap smear, ultrasound, birth control and tampons.

But ‘the greatest thing since sliced bread,’ must be communication technology. In the 70s we still wrote letters. Most homes had one phone, located in hall on a table that housed the white pages and 'not happy Jan' telephone directories and notepad. When the first mobile, bigger than a house brick arrived in the early 80s only a handful of people were rich enough or strong enough to own one. A decade later and we have a mobile that fits into our top pocket.

Now social media has spun us around again creating a brave new world, What is next? My guess is virtual reality technology, will shake off it's novelty gloss and will develop innovative technology for medical research. Bring it on. Wishing you a healthy, innovative and rewarding 2018.

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He was, I think, in his mid-fifties, obviously took care of himself – the joggers and a taut stomach telling the story. We were sitting in the morning sun having coffee when he sat at the table next door to us.
‘Nice morning,’ he said and we agreed. The conversation flowed easily, we discovered we were all ‘locals’ that is we live on this magnificent stretch of coastline -- the Sunshine Coast in Queensland.
‘I worked in a Casino, met my wife there……..’ A perfect segue i...nto Peter’s reminiscent about our time in Nassau of ‘overseeing the count’ of the high rollers in the Bahamian Casino. It is one of those glorious stories, smudged with innuendos of Mafia connections, you tell grandkids about how Grandpa, as a young accountant, could easily have landed up in the harbour wearing cement boots – ‘dangerous times to find the discrepancies with the night’s take.’
We shared stories of gamblers who risked chips to the value of $5,000 or even more with every turn of the card at the Blackjack table. We posited that one of these chips could have done so much to help others but these gamblers were lost to the reality of life, cosseted in their glitzy surrounds and VIP suites, they felt invincible.
We laughed, we frowned, and were in sync.
Upon leaving he said ‘ Nice to meet you.’ Yes -- it was so nice to meet him, a brief moment in time where we shared similar events and values with a stranger.
A brief moment in time where you have no expectations and equally the stranger has no expectation of you. We walked away feeling good.
Happiness is made up of moments don’t you think?
*picture of VIP high rollers suite somewhere in Las Vegas
with Mary Atkins

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Fifty plus years ago I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and after six years of suffering the debilitating disease I made a remarkable return to long-lasting health.

In a quest to find answers to questions that have long plagued me, I have laid bare my illness and recovery in my new book 'A Journey of Creative Healing,' comparing my beliefs -- why I became sick and how I recovered -- with other key players. These are scientists who are opening our minds to the cause and... effect of disease, holistic doctors who are on a similar crusade to identify characteristics of radical healing, medical reporters whose life work is to bring us the latest news on healing from around the world, and patients who have also made remarkable recoveries.

AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 2018

In examining disease, we gain wisdom about anatomy and physiology and biology. In examining the person with disease, we gain wisdom about life.”
Oliver Sacks
Neurologist, Naturalist, Historian, and Author

Mary Atkins

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Mary Atkins Author updated their cover photo.

My page, Mary Atkins Blog Bits. has grown up and now wants to be known as Mary Atkins Author. Unashamedly, if you have not already done so, I am asking you to take a moment and LIKE my author page. with Mary Atkins

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Leonard Cohen tells how a Spanish Guitarist gave him a gift of music and poetry xx

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Cadena COPE

#VÍDEO El español que enseñó a tocar la guitarra a Leonard Cohen. El legendario cantautor y poeta canadiense ha fallecido a los 82 años #LeonardCohenRIP http://ww.cope.es/vjtat

Memories of an an amazing Tasmania adventure xx

Mary Atkins Author added 5 new photos.

Tasmania Central Highlands Heading West .....

THE DRIVE from Tarraleah to Strahan took us through some of the most beautiful country we have ever seen. The jour...ney wound and corkscrewed its way along a decent road running beside a series of crystal clear lakes surrounded by wooded slopes. We stopped and had a walk beside Lake Binny. The early morning sun on the lake reflected the surrounding mountains and forested slopes. Even the most cynical heart could not be moved by this bounty of nature and our responsibility for it’s stewardship.

We were in the World Heritage listed Wilderness or known as the Lake St. Clair National Park. I did not know that there are certain criteria to be met to be listed as a World Heritage site and this southwest area of Tasmania has one of the highest rankings in the world. I can understand why they call it a wilderness but to me it was more like an enchanted forest.

Sitting high and comfortably in Vella D’s cabin as we purred along we saw wildflowers growing on the side of the road and meadows with exquisite grasses and tress softly fanning into the denser rain forests. The cream on top of our cakes was seeing two echidnas waddling on the side of the road and all this in the most glorious sunshine and bluest skies you can imagine. Interestingly at this height above sea level the clouds seemed to flatten out like God had got a spatula, flattened the fluffiness and pulled it out to fade into the blue.

Nothing prepares you for the slap in the face, of the ravaged mountains around Queenstown as you take the twist in the road from nature to mining. Mined for its copper the mountains stand denuded and scarred.
The road down into Queenstown was extremely steep and twisted making you face with each downward spiral the reality of this ugliness done by man.

The shock of seeing these mountains really brings home the beauty of the wilderness and just clearly makes you understand how vital it is for us, and future generations, to be aware of how we are managing our environment. Queenstown, in spite of all its resources of copper riches was a poor little town. Sad and down at heel. We were glad to get out of it and journey on to Strahan.

At last Macquarie Harbour opened up before us and we could see the pretty township below and the vista of Macquarie Harbour.

Strahan is tourist destination that rings all the right bells. It sits on the shoreline of Macquarie Harbour, which is two and half times Sydney Harbour. The bay is graced with pretty wooden federation style architecture. Nice little cafés and restaurants compete with myriad of accommodation opportunities. There is plenty to do from seeing the wilderness in a seaplane, catching the historic rail line to Queenstown, visiting a sawmill or take a cruise up the Gordon River.

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Memories of 2013 blog xx

Mary Atkins Author

Day 21 - 75- Day Blog

Twenty-first day. Time for a review. When I started this blog as a daily writing challenge, I knew my ego would be searching for validatio...n. The nature of my limiting beliefs are that I do not belong, not worthy and not good enough. The platform of FB and a daily blog is the perfect vehicle to test these out. I know that there will be those sincerely well intentioned souls who will want to reassure me of my worth. But this piece is not about gaining your approval it is about me standing in my soul and being authentic. The blogs have given me the opportunity to be aware, to observe how the ego likes to spin its story, softly at first, softly softly catch pretty monkey, gaining momentum with every sneaky nudging thought. But the testing has proved my mettle. Now the seeking recognition pain is like a dying tooth. Not so chronic that you have to rush to dentist and yell pull it but a momentary sharpness of pain when you bite on it. (appropriate because I cracked a tooth the other day and providing I eat on the other side of my mouth it behaves) Take this metaphor a step further - if you keep yourself safe you don't experience pain but you never experience the fullness of life that your soul may wish to dance. What my blog has taught me that my stories will always run given the opportunity but If I am not attached to others validation I am free to write from my heart and this sense of imaginary hurt is an illusion that I choose either to worry it on the mat or to let float past. The choice is a no boner, I choose my heart.

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PHONE ME

You know that hand sign people use for ‘phone me’? The one with the thumb and little finger extended and the other three digits flat to the palm? It has never made sense to me. Why do people do that when lifting your slightly curled fist to the ear more accurately implies listening to the telephone.

A natural progression of thought must be that the sign is a modern thing associated with the new era of flip down mobile phones. When I researched it seems that sign ...started off life in Hawaii back in the 1960’s (my time my world) it was a greeting that surfers used to convey ‘hang loose bro’ little sister’. Known as the Shaka sign and now in common use by native Hawaiians to express the Aloha spirit of friendship.

But are you aware that this sign in the Caribbean it means something completely different. That fancy staged hand signal means you are up (no pun intended) for a sexual exchange.

The thumb indicates the shagger and the little finger the shaggee and moved back and forth – there you are one step ahead of me.
In China it means the letter 6 and in Russia it means you are offering to shout the next round of drinks.

I do try to be modern but you know I think I’ll stick to the good old fist in the ear trick, safer I think especially if I travel to Russia and am in a bar with multiples of Russians who only drink double vodkas. But the Caribbean is a different ballgame ..........

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A short time ago I had a trigger finger. Randomly and without being aware, the first joint of my little finger fell inwards to lay flat on the palm of my hand to stay like some mute testament to a neat amputation until I noticed it and physically pulled it out straight again. It did not hurt but it was disconcerting.

‘My word that’s a perfect trigger finger,’ said the ultrasound tech upon examination.

Secretly I was chuffed after all it’s quite a interesting talking point, ...

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‘It is by logic we prove, but intuition that we discover.’
Leonardo Da Vinci

Little voice of my Intuition what will you give me to write about today?

...

‘New Beginnings.’

Umm - New Beginnings. I see your reasoning with New Year’s day but a step away.

‘Yes but what else is obvious about New Beginnings Mary? You know when I softly speak you should always look for the obvious in my message.

Well, New Beginnings obviously means something is ending. Right?

‘And?’

Well, to end, to leave, to finish and turn your back on the old can often be a painful uncomfortable process.

‘Do you think change needs to be painful Mary?’

I think if you want to make serious life changes it needs the impetus of the stone in the shoe. Without it one would continue on in the same old way. Pain is the crucible that facilitates change.

‘Like the phoenix rising from the ashes?

Yes, that is it. The painful work of letting go of the past is always rewarded by unparalleled, uncharted and beyond our wildest imagination New Beginnings.

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HOW TO AVOID CRUISE SHIP BUFFET RAGE
The cruise ship buffets are café style serving stations that provide an extensive variety of dishes for breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner. They are usually located on the pool deck so you can dash in and grab an ice tea or a plate of tucker and take it back to your sunlounge by the pool. These buffets are a very popular option for passengers who don’t feel like formal dining or eating in one of the many specialty restaurants.

The ...

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Mary Atkins Author updated their cover photo.
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The small township of Akaroa on the coast of New Zealand boasts a Town Crier. But instead of calling 'hear ye, hear ye' as he rings his bell proclaiming the news and beauty of the area, Stephen Anzac Le Lievre calls 'ecoutez, ecoutez.'

Why may you ask is he asking in French?

We need to go back to 1837 when the area of Akaroa on the Banks Peninsula was rich pickings for the whale and seal fishermen and traders.

...

One of these men was Francois Langlois who had a vision to set up a French settlement in this lush and abundant part of the world nestling in an ancient volcano.

He negotiated a deal with a Maori chief to buy all of the Banks Peninsula for $1000 francs. Francois then sailed for France and set up a company (Nanto-Bordelaise Company) and lobbied the government for support.

The project had appeal. The British were in the North Island and relationships between France and Great Britain were certainly not entente cordiale. King Louis Philipe (1830 - 1848) saw merit in the endeavour and agreed that the French Navy would escort the ship Compte de Paris with its 59 emigrant on it's journey.

In Britain word was out about the plans to make Banks Peninsula into a French settlement. With haste, they sent naval officer Arthur Hobson to New Zealand to establish sovereignty of New Zealand. As the French navy and the Compte de Paris sailed south Hobson co-authored the Treaty of Waitangi which was signed on the 6 February 1840.

Arthur Hobson, now Governor of NZ sent a frigate Britomart to hoist the flag on the peninsula. You can imagine that it definitely took the wind out of the French sails as they sighted land and the distinctive Union Jack flying high on the headland.

'Merde - ceux dam anglais,' they murmured but what could they do. They came ashore and settled. In 1851 they were declared naturalised British subjects and were given Crown grants to their Akaroa land in 1852.

Ecoutez, Ecoutez - Stephen Le Lievre is proud to say the French influence is still alive and prospering in this most beautiful slice of NZ heaven.

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NORTH WEST OF TASMANIA - written a few years ago on a motorhome trip around the magic island.

'Entering the outskirts of Stanley we saw below us the rich dairy pasturelands and the long coastline that curved to form the white sanded Sawyer Bay on one side of the peninsula.

But what held our gaze was the incredible 152 metre high cake shaped monolith called ‘The Nut’ that dominated the end of the Bay. Not yet seen at this level, was the other splendid bay facing Bass Straig...

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LAUNCESTON -
The premier annual food FESTIVALE runs over 3 days and is now in its 27th year. The event brings the best of Tasmanian food, produce and wines together in the special location of the historic parklands of City Park Launceston. A few years ago I was lucky to be there and wrote this piece.

‘City Park is graced with ancient deciduous trees, five hectares of lawns and flower beds alive with colour from 'B' cup-size tea roses and petal perfect dahlias. A trail of h...appy flags, painted by local school children, spun around an elegant old rotunda. Circling the park was the food and drink stalls. To screen the back of their stalls, the organisers had given them banners again painted by the children. Acrobats, buskers, roving street theatre and good music added to the excitement.

The Launceston community and many from further a field were out in full force. Mums and Dads with babies in prams and their kids running with baked Binje potatoes filled with sour cream and cheese.

Tattooed bikies and rockers wiping greasy fingers after they had devoured the Possum Sausage taster or certified Australian Angus Beef steak sandwich.

Upscale ‘Prue’s’ with moss or putty coloured pants with matching jumpers tied loosely round their neck. Their well modulated 'Ya’s' could be heard above excited noise as they clutched their glass of Janz sparkle and kissed air with their kin.

Teenagers ran the gauntlet and swigged on bottles of Cascade and were pacified with bowls of nachos. More serious foodaphiles tried the locally smoked wallaby, oysters from Bruny, scallops from Stanley in Pernod and cream and had luscious cheese plates from Bruny Island and finished it with the local raspberries, strawberries and cream.

Visitors, like us stood out like saw thumbs as we were intent on visiting every stall while the locals wanted to meet and greet and graze solely on their favourite goodies.

We managed to go round all the stalls and you will be pleased to know that we put in a pretty fair effort. Besides the scallops, we had abalone, calamari from George Town on the Tamar, the possum taster (nice or rather I should say noice) plus the Bruny cheese plate especially loved their washed rind cheese, which is just sublime.

We sat on the lawns away from the stalls with a glass of our favourite Chartley Estate Pinot Gris in hand to watch the world go by. It was a perfect way to spend a summer evening in Tasmania.

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Cradle Mountain Lodge captures all the essential elements of the high-land country life. Dark timber paneling lit by soft pools of light from lamps led you into the heart of the lodge, the lounge where you could plant yourself in any one of the big stuffed leather chairs in front of a log fire and plan your bushwalking activities or simply read your newspaper.

Breakfast is served in the main restaurant, in front of another roaring log fire. You could choose to have your ev...

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