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The Original Hebrew word for "sin" has been wrongly translated... Its true meaning will pleasantly surprise you!

The original word sin means - to miss.

It doesn’t mean to commit something wrong; it simply means to miss, to be absent.

The Hebrew root for the word sin, means to miss.

That exists in a few English words: misconduct, misbehavior.

To miss means not to be there, doing something without being present there — this is the only sin. And the only virtue: while you are doing something you are fully alert — what Gurdjieff calls selfremembering, what Buddha calls being rightly mindful, what Krishnamurti calls awareness, what Kabir has called SURATI. To be there! — that’s all that is needed, nothing more. You need not change anything, and even if you try to change you cannot"



The original Hebrew word for sin is very beautiful. By translating it as “sin,” Christians have missed the very message of Jesus. The original Hebrew word for sin is so totally different from your idea of sin that it will be a surprise to you.

The root word means forgetfulness;

it has nothing to do with what you are doing.

The whole thing is whether you are doing it with conscious being or out of unconsciousness.

Are you doing it with a self-remembering or have you completely forgotten yourself?


Any action of unconsciousness is sin. The action may look virtuous, but it cannot be. You may create a beautiful façade, a character, a certain virtuousness; you may speak the truth, you may avoid lies; you may try to be moral, and so on and so forth. But if all this is coming from unconsciousness, it is all sin. It is because of this that Jesus has a tremendously significant saying. He says, “If your right eye causes you to sin, take it out and throw it away. It is much better for you to lose a part of your body than to have your whole body throw into hell.”

Now, if you don’t understand the real meaning of sin, you are bound to misinterpret the whole statement and Jesus will look too harsh, too violent. Saying, “If you right eye causes you to sin, take it out and throw it away,” does not look like his statement. A man of profound love and compassion, he cannot say this, he cannot be so violent. But this is how Christians have interpreted him.

What he means is this: Whatsoever causes you to forget yourself, Even if it is your right eye… That is just to emphasize the fact. It is simply a way of talking, an emphasis: “If your right eye causes you to forget yourself, then take it out and throw it away.” He is not saying anything that has to be taken literally; it is a metaphor. He is saying that it is better to be blind than to be forgetful of yourself, because the blind man who remembers himself is not blind, he has the real eye. But if a man who has eyes forgets himself, what is the use of having eyes? He cannot see even himself; what ELSE can he see?