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The second season of Tune Me What, the podcast bringing you the best in South African music, comes to a close...

We can hardly believe that we have two seasons of Tune Me What? under our belt. As we’ve said before, we embarked on this journey with the intention of sharing the South African music we grew up with...
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Media, opposition and civil society groups have been pushing back against government attempts to constrict political space, but as elections approach the fight will only get harder.

The relative peace Burundi has enjoyed since the end of civil war may be under threat. Following the ceasefire that ended 12 years of brutal conflict in 2005, the country has experienced a degree of stability....
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Posts

The Western Saharan singer reflects on a life away from home, the struggle for self-determination and her musical influences.

Political unrest in the Sahara is usually associated with Mali, a country still in the grip of conflict where, for a time, Islamist rebels banned music in the towns they captured. Ngoni master Bassekou...
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South Africa's brutal apartheid regime knew how to deal with dissent, but not so much with ridicule and disrespect. Hear the story of the songs that helped bring down Apartheid.

In 1989, the future in South Africa seemed bleak and hopeless. The government had declared another State of Emergency which suspended certain meagre civil liberties and allowed them to detain anyone suspected...
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Who Are You Calling Corrupt? Good Governance Begins at Home
Is claiming to be a leader in international development whilst presiding over structures that facilitate the loss of billions from Africa not a form of corruption itself?

In July, I wrote about some research that Health Poverty Action published in collaboration with 12 other UK and African NGOs. This research compared Africa’s annual financial losses to the rest of the...
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Miners Shot Down: Blood on Whose Hands?
Two years after 34 miners were killed by police at Marikana, a new documentary suggests responsibility goes to very top of the ANC.

“Repeatedly shot as they tried to surrender,” says Greg Marinovich. “Not just once. Coming up − two, three times with their hands in the air − shot repeatedly.”
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The iconic South African record company Shifty Records returns with a bang.

An iconic record company is out of hibernation to celebrate its 30th anniversary. Under normal circumstances, it would seem odd that a long moribund label would have a Lazarus moment which was more than...
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Although most residents of Sierra Leone's capital have yet to witness Ebola firsthand, the outbreak has nevertheless affected virtually all aspects of daily life.

It's midnight and I am driving around the East End of Freetown, Sierra Leone’s capital, with a young taxi driver known as Human Right. For the past year, I have regularly been accompanying Human Right...
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Lesotho's politicians have shown themselves to be capable of governing for the common good in the past. A return to this spirit is crucial now to avoid tragedy.

During the early hours of 30 August, soldiers in Lesotho surrounded the country’s police headquarters and Prime Minister’s residence, cutting power in the capital Maseru and shutting down radio stations...
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Is claiming to be a leader in international development whilst presiding over structures that facilitate the loss of billions from Africa not a form of corruption itself?

In July, I wrote about some research that Health Poverty Action published in collaboration with 12 other UK and African NGOs. This research compared Africa’s annual financial losses to the rest of the...
thinkafricapress.com

Two years after 34 miners were killed by police at Marikana, a new documentary suggests responsibility goes to very top of the ANC.

“Repeatedly shot as they tried to surrender,” says Greg Marinovich. “Not just once. Coming up − two, three times with their hands in the air − shot repeatedly.”
thinkafricapress.com

Nothing but bad news on the Ebola-front: five co-authors of the latest study on this deadly virus have died even before the article was published; a man infected with the virus has been quarantined in Senegal and there's a severe lack of the experimental drug ZMapp which has the potential to cure infected patients. WHO releases regular update reports that keep track of the situation on the ground: http://buff.ly/Y1eUtw

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"You can come from the dingiest place, but it’s about how are you going to take yourself, as trash or as golden? Nobody knows your struggle or what you’ve left behind at home, but it’s how you are going to represent yourself out to the world that matters the most."

In Conversation with Manthe Ribane, a Soweto based Performance Artist via Another Africa: http://buff.ly/1nKTWF4

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"This Disease is No Longer a Death Sentence": Combating Cervical Cancer in Kenya
A potential breakthrough has been made in the treatment of cervical cancer, but it is issues of accessibility, affordability and education that remain key.

Earlier this year, scientists working at the Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi made a potentially momentous breakthrough in the fight against cervical cancer. In a world-first clinical trial led by...
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Striking images by Pete Muller, who traveled to Sierra Leone to shoot this portrait of the country in the wake of the Ebola virus. http://buff.ly/1wMrZ98

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From Bamboo Bikes to low-cost personal computers, meet the top-12 young African entrepreneurs who are in the running for the Anzisha Price.

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The acclaimed Kenyan photographer Mohamed Amin would have turned 71 today. Amin (pictured here next to the Ugandan dictator Idi Amin) founded the Camerapix company at the age of 20, and in the following years he would become one of the most relied-upon African news photographers. He achieved international fame when his photos of the Ethiopian famine were used to draw attention to this crisis, eventually leading to the series of Live Aid concerts.

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