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The “Boss” Family Tree The first wild horses, a group of 300 mares, arrived at the Sanctuary in 1988. Their story was greatly embellished when Boss was introduced in 1994 and the primary family tree of the Sanctuary was planted. The Boss Family Tree is rooted deep within this land and the branches stretch from one side of the Sanctuary to another. Some of the most beloved horses of the Sanctuary, sponsored by people from around the globe, can be traced to Boss and the wild mares drawn to him. Boss sired Medicine Hattie (born 1997), Painted Desert and Red Roan (born 1999), Champagne Lady (born 2000), and Ghost Dancer's Shadow (born 2005)
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Wild Horse Language of Love - 2017
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Christmas Quilt Raffle - Dec 22, 2017
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Posts

Til the Cows Come Home

There is one horse here at the Sanctuary that is particularly happy these days – Diesel. And what makes Diesel so happy? It could be the fresh hay he receives every day. Or warm sunshine on his back after two very snowy days. But Diesel is happy now because the cows came home.

When Diesel arrived at the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary in September 2016, he was physically (and emotionally) bruised, battered, and bewildered. He went from being wild... and free on the range to being kept in a stable, and ultimately, he was abandoned. Three other homes tried to work with Diesel before he was finally declared “too wild.” By the time he arrived in South Dakota, he was afraid of humans, being handled, needles, and enclosed spaces. And he had a health issue that caused his hair to fall out.

For months, Diesel kept his distance from the ranch staff, stayed as far away from the corrals as possible, and preferred to be by himself. Then came the cows. In the late winter/early spring, the ranch cows come in from the pasture for calving season. They stay close by so we can monitor the calving mommas and the babies. While other horses were moved out of the cow pasture, the decision was made to leave Diesel with the cows. He simply stayed on his own and, occasionally, seemed to give a nod of acknowledgement to the cows as they sauntered by with their babies.

We started noticing a change in Diesel. He was more content. And when the cows left for summer pasture, he seemed rather discouraged, but was tolerant of now being in the same space with other horses again.

Last week, in the midst of a snow storm, the cows decided that they were ready to come in to the ranch in preparation for calving season. They made it to the pasture across from Diesel and he noticed. The gates were opened and the cows “came home.” Diesel was practically jumping for joy to see his friends!

Diesel is healthy and happy here at the Sanctuary – your donations and support make this possible!

Make a difference for Diesel and all the horses by visiting www.wildmustangs.com

Story by Melinda Kersten
Photo by Heather Oliver
2018

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Good morning Friends!

We received over 12" of snow yesterday and we are currently at -5 degrees today. There are lots of snow drifts and the ranch staff is busy! But our wild horses are doing great and enjoying the sunshine. Stay warm everyone!

www.wildmustangs.com

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Rescued BLM pony mare, early morning
Photo Karla R. LaRive

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February Storm Moves in Again!

American Mustang gelding has visitor riding on his back in the snow. The birds like to eat the insects that might be flying around.

Donate Today! http://www.wildmustangs.com/donate

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Photo by Charles and Rita Summers

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Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary
Nonprofit Organization

"As a young cowboy in the 1930's, I grew up with wild horses in Oregon, I have loved them since my boyhood as they've given me great joy - from the first young mustang I trained and rode out on the range, to the bands running free about me, adding their beauty to an already fabulous landscape.." - Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary Founder, Dayton Hyde (Excerpt from All the Wild Horses 2006)

Open Year Round
www.wildmustangs.com
Donate - Sponsor - Visit

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Curly mustang, Lakota Song (center) with friends
Photo Karla R. LaRive
Winter 2017

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Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary
Nonprofit Organization

Don't forget, Our Mother's Day "Wild Horse" Lakota satin star quilt raffle tickets are still available! Thank you for your kind support of the wild horses!

Raffles tickets - http://www.wildmustangs.com/…/mother's-day-wild-horse-star-…

My dear Buttercup
With love, Honey
Story by Melinda Kersten
Photo by Rianna Schmidt
Learn more at www.wildmustangs.com...
2018

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My Dear Buttercup,

Oh my, the winters in the southern Black Hills of South Dakota can be cold! I think of you often on these cold days, wondering how you are enjoying life off the range in your new home. Do you remember how we would chase snowflakes in our younger days? The briskness of a snow day would energize us to run and play even when our mothers insisted that we needed to conserve our energy for the bitter cold nights in the wild.

How do you spend your winter days... now? I hear that many horses stay inside on snowy days and, if you do go out, you have to wear a blanket. Is that true? What does that feel like? Can you still feel the snow as it piles on your back? Where do you sleep at night? Can you see the stars?

Here at the Sanctuary, there are so many canyons and hills where we can escape the prairie winds but still see the night sky in all its glory. Fresh hay is delivered every day. We munch on it all day long and that keeps us quite warm. Sometimes, when there’s a light snow, I can almost see steam radiating off the backs of my friends thanks to the hay and energy cake we eat.

Yes, the ice and snow and cold can be a bother, but I have my freedom and my friends. (And no one makes me wear a blanket!) I understand that there are many humans that make my life possible. Some come to visit, others drive the tractor and feed truck. I am often called by a name and told that a sponsor loves me. I really appreciate the humans in my life, and am thankful that they let me have my freedom in this beautiful place.

With love,
Honey

Story by Melinda Kersten
Photo by Rianna Schmidt
2018

Learn more at www.wildmustangs.com

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"Sanctuaries like our 11,000 acre Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary are not the complete answer to the problems of America's wild horse, but they are an answer. Here the horses run wild and free on their own land, no longer in competition with other land users for water and feed.

The wild horses on the sanctuary will spend their lives here. No slaughter house awaits them ever or no lonely life of standing in the mud in some corral. - Sanctuary founder and author, Dayton O. ...Hyde

Open Year Round
www.wildmustangs.com
Donate - Sponsor - Visit

Rescued Adobe Town Appaloosas, Sundance and Storm embrace each other at the Sanctuary
Photo Karla R. LaRive
2017

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Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary
Nonprofit Organization

Be My Valentine!

www.wildmustangs.com

Choctaw pony mare, Celestial Moon...
Photo Rianna Schmidt

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Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary
Nonprofit Organization

As the temperatures drop, the staff is dedicated in putting out up to 25 bales daily. Thank you for your continued support of our wild horses!

Donate to Hay: http://www.wildmustangs.com/…/…/product/donate-a-bale-of-hay

American mustangs follow the feed truck in the snow...
Photos Karla R. LaRive
Feb 2018

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Our American mustangs during the recent video shoot with KOTA Territory News "The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary turns 30 later this year!"

www.wildmustangs.com

Photos Karla R. LaRive ...
January 2018

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Yippee!!! It's a SNOW DAY!!!

Right now, there is so much snow coming down, it's hard to see across the pasture. Some of the older horses are content to let the snow pile up on their backs while they eat the delicious hay the tractor brought. But my friends and I love to play in the snow. We can race to the gate and back to the hay for a nibble, then run and run some more!

When one of us starts running, we all go. Even Brumby and Opal join in the fun from their corral. Th...at Brumby runs like a crazy kid - but his momma looks rather annoyed. I bet, if she could, she'd open the gate and let him play in the big pasture with us.

Sure, we love the sweet grass of summertime, but snow is so much fun! it sticks to our whiskers and looks funny on the backs of the black and bay horses. The snow also makes the feed truck go more slowly which makes it easier to try to sneak extra cake out of the back of the truck. And we sure would not mind if the hay tractor got stuck in our pasture with an extra bale or two of hay on board!

The hay and cake help us stay warm and give us lots of energy. Big trucks brought in lots of hay last week, but the stack is much shorter now. I hope we don't run out! Gotta go...my friends are challenging me to race to the water tank!

Your donation today helps buy more hay - see www.wildmustangs.com/donate

Photo by Heather Oliver Photography
Story by Melinda Kersten

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Repost - KOTA Territory News

The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary turns 30 later this year! Meet just some of the people committed to saving hundreds of wild mustangs.

Video segment features Sanctuary founder, Dayton O. Hyde and Communications Director Karla R. LaRive

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Producer, Nick Reagan Kota
February 8, 2018

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Nick Reagan Kota is with Karla R. LaRive.

Check out the story behind the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary.

Repost -
Nick Reagan Kota
February 7, 2018

The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary Celebrates it's 30th anniversary this year. Come run with the mustangs tomorrow, only on "Good Morning KOTA Territory News."

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Nick Reagan Kota

The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary Celebrates it's 30th anniversary this year. Come run with the mustangs tomorrow, only on Good Morning Kota Territory.

Check out our Gift Shop for great Valentine's Day gift ideas!

Our Visitor's Center and Gift Shop are open daily from 9am - 5pm Monday thru Saturday. Closed on Sunday until Spring

New winter hours November 1st thru April 30th, 2018. Tours By Reservation Only. Weather permitting.

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89 % of all proceeds from our Gift Shop sales goes toward the care of the Sanctuary mustangs. Your generous donations, sponsorships and purchases from our gift shop help keep the mustangs free to run! www.wildmustangs.com/store-popular

Photo Karla R. LaRive
February 2018

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Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary
Nonprofit Organization

Brothers Love Too
Share the Love this Valentine's Day

It's the perfect photo. One worthy of this year's holiday card. Of course it will become the profile picture - maybe even the cover shot. They really do love each other and this photo proves it!

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Now let me tell you the real story...

Opal was born first in 2016. The daughter of Choctaws Pearl and Lakna. Throughout the summer, she frolicked in the grass near the main gate to the ranch. This girl wanted to make sure that everyone saw her run, and jump, and kick, and fall down, and practically skip. She had an audience of humans every day. And when the humans weren't looking, she had the undivided attention of her mother, grandmother (Goblin), and Auntie Angel.

Then he was born - Brumby - the son of Choctaws Angel and Lakna. He was cute and he was getting attention. He wanted to keep up with Opal, so he quickly learned to run, jump, and kick, but Opal was having none of it. Opal suddenly became "the cool kid." Too cool to be caught watching some little pony running around like crazy. Too cool to be bothered with his constant teasing and taunting to play. When would he ever just leave her alone?

For his part, Brumby was determined to get Opal to play with him. He would chase her around the corral, race her to a new bale of hay, and perhaps even deliver a little bit of pushing and shoving when the humans brought the feed.

For months, Brumby antagonized Opal and Opal tolerated Brumby. The ranch visitors always stopped by their corral hoping to feel the softness of a youngster's nose but, instead, were typically witnesses to a race across the corral, from barn to hay bale, or a complete run around the corral's perimeter. The humans in the office were always amused when Brumby would start chasing Opal and she would start to race away. It was as if she really did want to play, but only on her terms, and only when she could be assured to win.

In the Spring of 2017, the moment of this photo happened. This is such a tender display of affection from a little brother to his big sister. You can just feel the love between them.

This perfect moment is more like an "Ew! He's kissing me!!!!!!" moment captured for eternity in a digital snapshot.

Opal and Brumby are part of the Choctaw Preservation program at the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary.

Learn more at www.wildmustangs.com and be sure to check out our gift shop for great Valentine's Day gift ideas for your brother or sister!

Photo by Gabriella Beck
Story by Melinda Kersten

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